Obama bends on birth control


WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Friday proposed a work-around for religious nonprofits that object to providing health insurance that covers birth control.

The government’s new regulation attempts to create a barrier between religious groups and contraception coverage, through insurers or a third party, that would still give women free access to contraception. It wasn’t immediately clear whether religious leaders would accept the new approach, or whether it would stem the tide of lawsuits by Roman Catholic charities and other faith-affiliated nonprofits nationwide challenging the requirement to provide such coverage.

The Catholic Health Association, a trade group for hospitals, and the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops separately had no immediate reaction, saying they were studying the regulations. Policy analyst Sarah Lipton-Lubet of the American Civil Liberties Union said the rule appeared to meet the ACLU’s goal of providing “seamless coverage” of birth control for the affected women.

Local religious nonprofits said Friday they had not had time to review the proposal nor did University of Dayton officials, said Cilla Shindell, spokeswoman for the Roman Catholic school. UD already has an employee health insurance plan that covers contraceptive care.

Spokesman Dan Andriacco said the Archdiocese of Cincinnati had no comment at this time: “The experts on this issue at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops are studying the details of the administration’s proposal.”

Dave Lamb, director of communications for Community Mercy Health Partners in Springfield, said, “We welcome the president’s proposal and we will be reviewing it.”

Columbus attorney Donald Brey, a board member of the Catholics for Ohio political-action group, campaigned against the president on religious liberty.

While he hadn’t fully reviewed the proposal Friday, he said it appears to eliminate some problematic restrictions on the definition of a religious organization. He remained concerned that businesses owned by religious-minded people opposed to the drugs would not be exempt.

“It sounds like good news, hopefully it is good news,” Brey said. “But even if you give the most charitable interpretation to what he says he has done, there’s still a way to go.”

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, was similarly cautious. “I plan to review the revised regulations carefully,” he said, “and I am hopeful that they will respect the religious freedom of all Americans.”

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said in a statement the compromise would provide “women across the nation with coverage of recommended preventive care at no cost, while respecting religious concerns.”

The regulation is part of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, known as the Affordable Care Act. The birth-control rule, first introduced a year ago, became an election issue, with advocates for women praising the mandate as a victory and religious leaders decrying it as an attack on faith groups.

The new health care law requires most employers, including faith-affiliated hospitals and nonprofits, to provide health insurance that includes artificial contraception, including sterilization, as a free preventive service. The goal, in part, is to help women space out pregnancies to promote health.

Under the original rule, only those religious groups which primarily employ and serve people of their own faith — such as churches — were exempt. But other religiously affiliated groups, such as church-affiliated universities, Catholic Charities and hospitals, were told they had to comply.

Roman Catholic bishops, evangelicals and some religious leaders who have generally been supportive of Obama’s policies lobbied fiercely for a broader exemption. The Catholic Church prohibits the use of artificial contraception. Evangelicals generally permit the use of birth control, but some object to specific methods such as the morning-after contraceptive pill, which they argue is tantamount to abortion.

Obama had promised to change the birth control requirement so insurance companies — and not faith-affiliated employers — would pay for the coverage, but religious leaders said more changes were needed to make the plan work.

Since then, more than 40 lawsuits have been filed by religious nonprofits and secular for-profit businesses claiming the mandate violates their religious beliefs. As expected, this latest regulation does not provide any accommodation for individual business owners who have religious objections to the rule.

In the latest version of the rule, houses of worship remain exempt, including those that offer social services such as a food pantry directly from their buildings.

At the same time, a mechanism would be set up to provide contraception coverage for women employees of religious employers that is outside of the employer’s health insurance plan. It would allow those employees to be covered without their employer “contracting, arranging, paying, or referring for such coverage.”

If a nonprofit identifies itself as religious and has private insurance, the private insurer will work directly with women employees to provide coverage for contraception. Many religious nonprofits, however, are self-insured. In those cases, a third party, not the religious employer, would handle the coverage.

Questions remained about how the services ultimately would be funded, but the Health and Human Services department said any additional cost would be covered by a deduction in federal user fees for whoever issues the policy. The federal agency has not tallied an overall cost of the plan, according to Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, an HHS deputy policy director.

In its new version of the rule, the department argued that the change wouldn’t impose new costs on insurers because it would save them money “from improvements in women’s health and fewer child births.”

John Gehring, Catholic program director at Faith in Public Life, a liberal advocacy group based in Washington, called the compromise “a strong signal that the administration is responsive to the concerns of Catholic institutions.”

The Alliance Defending Freedom, a conservative religious liberty group which is representing several for-profit businesses in lawsuits over the regulation, said it would continue to press for exemptions for business owners in court. So far, about 10 businesses have obtained temporary injunctions against the regulation while their cases move through the courts.

The latest version of the mandate is now subject to a 60-day public comment period. The mandate takes effect for religious nonprofits in August.

Staff writer Jessica Wehrman contributed to this report.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in News

Caitlyn Jenner talks O.J. Simpson, Trump, meeting Steven Tyler on ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live!’
Caitlyn Jenner talks O.J. Simpson, Trump, meeting Steven Tyler on ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live!’

Caitlyn Jenner made an appearance on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” on Tuesday and discussed President Trump, O.J. Simpson being up for parole and meeting Steven Tyler. The reality TV star said that meeting the Aerosmith lead singer Sunday was sort of a full circle moment for her. Rolling Stone reported that the two met at a Starkey Hearing...
Sears to begin sale of Kenmore appliances on Amazon
Sears to begin sale of Kenmore appliances on Amazon

Sears announced Thursday that it will begin sellling its full line of Kenmore-brand appliances online through Amazon. The retailer, which has been struggling the past few years and has closed stores across the country, saw an 8 percent jump in the price of its stock in pre-market trading on the announcement. "We continuously look for opportunities...
McDonald’s employee fired for refusing to serve uniformed police officer
McDonald’s employee fired for refusing to serve uniformed police officer

A Virginia McDonald’s restaurant has taken “appropriate action” after a uniformed police officer was denied service by a drive-through employee. Scott Naff, an officer for the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, had reportedly paid for his food at the restaurant’s drive-through when he pulled up to the...
Clark County groups combine for hazmat training
Clark County groups combine for hazmat training

Firefighters and area health officials spent Thursday morning training to react in case of a major chemical spill or similar emergency. The exercise, which lasted most of the day, was designed to give rescuers and staff at the Springfield Regional Medical Center hands-on experience with how to deal with emergencies involving hazardous materials, said...
2 new Harry Potter-related books coming this fall
2 new Harry Potter-related books coming this fall

In celebration of the 20th year anniversary of the release of the first book in the Harry Potter series, J.K. Rowling has announced plans for an exhibit about the fictional wizard at the British Library.  >> Read more trending news  In collaboration, two new series-related books will be released. “Harry Potter: A History...
More Stories