Trial of Bin Laden's son-in-law set to begin in NYC


Jury selection will begin Monday for the trial of an al-Qaida  propagandist accused of calling for terrorist attacks against the U.S.

Sulaiman abu Ghaith, who is Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, gained attention after appearing in two videos after 9/11 urging Muslims to carry out more attacks. (Via ABC)

He was captured in Turkey last year, then finally detained by American officials on a stopover in Jordan and brought to New York. (Via CBS)

New York Daily News reports abu Ghaith's lawyers attempted to dismiss the charges or delay the trial last week — claiming they have the wrong man. But that motion was denied Saturday.

The prosecutors are seeking a sentence of life in prison without parole for abu Ghaith, who has pleaded not guilty on three charges involving conspiracy to kill Americans and providing resources to terrorists 

Because abu Ghaith did not directly plan or carry out any terrorist attacks, the death penalty is not being considered. And the defense also hopes to portray him as just a low-level al-Qaida member. (Via The New York Times

Of course, the trial is not without controversy as many question whether suspected terrorists should be tried in the U.S. court system.

According to the Los Angeles Times, some believe he should not receive the same due-process rights as U.S. citizens, and those accused of war crimes should be tried in military court at Guantanamo Bay.

But President Obama has been a staunch advocate in closing down the military prison, and the Justice Department wants to show these kinds of trials can successfully be carried out in U.S. courts. (Via The Wall Street Journal)

Abu Ghaith is currently being held in a high-security prison dubbed a "mini Guantanamo" just blocks away from Ground Zero in New York.

More on Newsy 



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Nation World

Civil rights activist, comedian Dick Gregory dies weeks after local performance
Civil rights activist, comedian Dick Gregory dies weeks after local performance

Civil rights activist and comedian Dick Gregory died Saturday, his family confirmed in a social media post. He passed away at age 84 in Washington, DC., nearly three weeks after his one-night appearance earlier this month in the Miami Valley. The best-selling author and 1968 write-in presidential candidate performed Aug. 2 at the Dayton Funny Bone...
Civil rights activist Dick Gregory dead at 84
Civil rights activist Dick Gregory dead at 84

Noted comedian, actor and civil rights activist Dick Gregory has died at 84. His family confirmed the death Saturday through social media. Gregory was hospitalized with a serious but stable condition, his son Christian said Thursday. Gregory is survived by his wife Lillian and their 10 children.
Woman holding American flag dragged by protester in Boston
Woman holding American flag dragged by protester in Boston

The Boston “Free Speech” rally ended with 33 arrested and while police were very diligent about keeping the right-wing groups away from protesters, there were still isolated incidents of violence. A clip showed a woman holding an American flag as a protester tries to rip it from her hands. The woman held on to the flag and is dragged...
USS Indianapolis discovered after 72 years 
USS Indianapolis discovered after 72 years 

The wreckage of the USS Indianapolis, which was torpedoed and sank during the final days of World War II, has been found 18,000 feet below the north Pacific Ocean. The discovery was made Friday by a team of civilian researchers led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, according to the billionaire’s website. "To be able to honor the brave...
Widow texts Pulse gunman alibi, deletes message night of attack, new court filing claims
Widow texts Pulse gunman alibi, deletes message night of attack, new court filing claims

Noor Salman is accused of helping her husband plan and carry out the June 12, 2016, attack on Pulse nightclub in Orlando, and a document filed by prosecutors this week is shedding new light on the case. The document filed Thursday lists specific instances that prosecutors intend to pursue during trial, and alludes to a text message allegedly sent by...
More Stories