Georgetown student creates Facebook page honoring janitors, other campus workers


Georgetown University business student Febin Bellamy was one of hundreds of college students on the school's campus who completed his daily routine -- going to class, eating on campus, studing at a library -- focused and with few distractions. Throughout his days, he encountered professors, friends and other students and greeted them without skipping a beat. But one group of people went largely unnoticed by Bellamy and his peers.

>> Read more trending stories  

"There was this space, like ice, separating us," Oneil Batchelor, a janitor who worked on the campus, told The Washington Post

But eventually, Bellamy spoke up. He began by saying hello to Batchelor and later graduated to making small talk with him. From there, the two started talking about more meaningful topics: their experiences as immigrants, their entrepreneurial dreams, politics and music.

Batchelor was one of many people around campus --  including dozens of cafeteria workers, janitors and maintenance workers -- who Bellamy felt were being overlooked.

"Once you see it, you can't unsee it," Bellamy said.

Bellamy, 22, immigrated to the U.S. from India when he was 5. When he was a child, his parents worked during the day, and they attended night school to earn their college degrees. 

Bellamy told The Washington Post he could empathize with workers on campus, many of whom are immigrants working for better lives.

So he created Unsung Heroes, a Facebook page that highlights campus workers with personal profiles. The profiles detail their lives, providing background information and a peek into the lives of the people who work to keep the campus operating efficiently.

Among those people are Batchelor, who immigrated from Jamaica with dreams of opening his own food business in the U.S., a dining hall cook who fled El Salvador during a civil war and another cook who was separated from his parents as a child during the Vietnam War.

The page, which began as a class project, gives a name and a story to many previously ignored workers at Georgetown.

"Everybody's in their own world," Batchelor told The Washington Post.  "A lot of students have good hearts and were raised right. It's just not always easy for them to get to know people around them."

Unsung Heroes helps students do just that -- get to know the people around them who matter.

The page introduced students to Batchelor and raised $2,500 for him to jump-start his dream of creating a Jamaican food business, which he launched on campus.

The group also raised more than $5,500 to fund a trip to Sudan to reunite a cashier with his family, who he hasn't seen for more than four decades. 

"I walk through campus now, and people are waving at me, saying 'hi' all the time," Batchelor said.

So far, 19 unsung heroes have been featured on the group's Facebook page.

Read more at The Washington Post.

Unsung Hero #17 - Umberto "Suru" Ripai, Food & Service Worker at Leo O'Donovan Dining Hall
"

 

Unsung Hero #10 - José Manzanares, Food & Service Worker at Leo O'Donovan Dining Hall

 

 


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Nation World

Butler Tech moves ahead with rapid expansion plan
Butler Tech moves ahead with rapid expansion plan

The big changes at one of Ohio’s largest career school systems keep coming. Though it’s less than two years old, Butler Tech’s leading edge Bioscience Center in West Chester Township is already expanding its classroom space for the upcoming 2017-2018 school year. And school officials are moving on additional plans to add to the two-story...
Rain can’t dampen excitement at first day of Clark County Fair
Rain can’t dampen excitement at first day of Clark County Fair

Heavy storms passed through the first day of the Clark County Fair on Friday morning, but fairgoers seemed not to notice. For Susan Delong of Xenia, there was fair food to be eaten and shows to watch. “We were a little concerned about the weather,” said Delong, who attends the Clark County Fair every year. “But my granddaughter was...
Students test skills in Springfield by building spaghetti bridges
Students test skills in Springfield by building spaghetti bridges

Using a pound of dry spaghetti noodles, students from the Miami Valley were able to build bridges that held 5 pounds, 10 pounds and even 30 pounds of weight Friday morning at the Clark State Performing Art Center. The students were taking part in the Johns Hopkins University Engineering Innovation program at Clark State Community College. The four-week...
Air France to launch new airline specifically for millennials
Air France to launch new airline specifically for millennials

Air France will launch a new airline specifically for passengers aged 18 to 35. On Thursday, the airline announced its new airline, Joon, which will begin operating routes this fall.  >> Read more trending news According to a news release, Joon’s targeted clientele is young working professionals whose lifestyles revolve around...
Korn’s Brian Welch apologizes for comments on Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington’s suicide
Korn’s Brian Welch apologizes for comments on Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington’s suicide

Just hours after Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington was found dead from suicide, Brian “Head” Welch, who is a guitarist for the band Korn, made a few controversial statements on his Facebook page about the singer’s death. Welch made a series of posts, all of which have since been deleted from his page, criticizing the singer...
More Stories