Wright-Patt workers told to report to work Friday despite shutdown

5:42 a.m. Friday, Feb. 9, 2018 Military

UPDATE @5:40 a.m.

The House voted 240-186 to end a government shutdown.

The bill will now go to President Trump.

UPDATE @12:50 a.m.

The U.S. government was ordered to close at midnight.

Vice President Mike Pence said the Trump administration is “hopeful” the government shutdown will not last long.

>> The Latest: Budget office ordered U.S. government closed

FIRST REPORT

Wright-Patterson employees were told to show up for work Friday even if Congress fails to reach a budget agreement to avoid a shutdown at midnight Thursday, a base official said.

“We will follow the standard procedure that we did the last time” the base shuttered for a three-day partial federal government closure last month, said Marie Vanover, a base spokeswoman.

RELATED: Threat of government shutdown wearing on workers

Sen. Rand Paul is holding up a vote on the Senate budget deal, saying he can’t in “all good faith” move ahead with the deal without more debate.

The Kentucky Republican says he came to Congress to fight deficits. But now, he says, Republicans and Democrats are “spending us into oblivion.”

Lawmakers are facing a midnight deadline. The deal pending in the Senate must first pass the Senate, then the House and be signed into law to avoid a government shutdown. The deal appears to have the votes to pass, but rules of the Senate allow individual senators to hold up the process.

Could cause government to shutdown if deal not reached by midnight

Paul brushed off pleas from Senate leaders.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says, “It’s time to vote.” Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says, “We’re in risky territory here.”

The shutdown that struck Jan. 20-22 sent about 8,600 base civil service employees home on a one-day work week furlough. Employees were required to report to work to receive notices.

All military personnel and some “essential” employee, such as police, firefighters and medical personnel ,also were required to work during the shutdown last month.

RELATED: Thousands head back to work at Wright-Patt as shutdown ends

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force opened for four hours on the first day of the shutdown before it received an order to close.

Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park sites, including the Wright-Dunbar Interpretive Center in Dayton and Huffman Prairie Flying Field Interpretive Center near Wright-Patterson, also temporarily shuttered.

The Associated Press contributed to this report