CONTINUING COVERAGE:

Fatal ride malfunction at Ohio State Fair

Springfield airport runways get nearly $500K upgrade


The Springfield Beckley Municipal Airport is undergoing major pavement repairs that started June 20.

Taxiways Bravo (B) and Foxtrot (F) will be affected by this construction.

These taxiways were built in the early 1990s but have developed serious cracks that need to be addressed, according to Airport Manager Don Smith. The project will aim to rehabilitate more than 150,000 square feet of pavement.

The city of Springfield has successfully leveraged state funding from the Ohio Department of Transportation’s Airport Grant Program. The provisions of this program provide reimbursement for 95 percent of the total construction cost, or $491,890 for the two projects. The Shelley Construction Co. of Sidney, Ohio, will oversee the construction.

The city of Springfield owns and operates the Springfield-Beckley Airport complex. Conveniently located four miles south of I-70, Springfield-Beckley represents an unparalleled blend of an airport, industrial park and joint military base, comprising approximately 1,800 acres. Nestled between Dayton and Columbus, the airport is just a 20-minute drive from Wright Patterson Air Force Base.

Springfield receives recognition as Promise Zone Finalist

In other news, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has named Springfield a Promise Zone finalist.

This designation doesn’t name the city as a Promise Zone, but being named a finalist reflects on the strength and determination of those in Springfield working to better the community.

“Congratulations on the fine work and collaboration that has resulted in your community being named a finalist. On behalf of all of the participating (Federal) agencies, we look forward to working with you and your community,” said a spokesperson from HUD.

Over the coming days, the application team will coordinate with HUD to schedule a debrief on the application and will continue to share information as it becomes available.

Traffic signal battery back-up systems

The summer has begun with favorable weather to enjoy the many outdoor activities available in the city of Springfield. As we have all seen in Ohio, this can quickly change and our fun can be dampened by inclement weather.

The heavy rain and lightning associated with thunderstorms can prompt our City Service Department employees to respond to various issues, including clogged street drains, downed trees and traffic signal malfunctions.

Over the past six years the city has worked with the Ohio Department of Transportation to secure federal funding for the installation of battery back-up systems at our 25 busiest intersections. These systems help better utilize resources and maintain a safe environment for the motoring public by allowing traffic signals to function normally for up to 12 hours in the event of a power outage.

With this back-up measure in place, city crews are able to focus their efforts on other issues that may arise during a storm.

Jim Bodenmiller is the Springfield city manager.

Community members are invited to submit a Community Commentary column for publication. Columns should be approximately 500 words in length and will be edited for publication. The Springfield News-Sun will make the final decision on whether they will be published. Any column submissions should be emailed to Editor Samantha Sommer at samantha.sommer@coxinc.com. For more info, call 937-328-0346.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

What are people saying about red light cameras coming back on?
What are people saying about red light cameras coming back on?

On Wednesday the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that state lawmakers went too far with the 2015 traffic camera law that essentially forced cities to turn off the cameras. City leaders such as Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley praised the decision saying it will make streets safer and cut down accidents. Others like state Rep. Bill Seitz, R-Cincinnati, say that the...
Supreme court ruling allows Springfield to turn on red light cameras
Supreme court ruling allows Springfield to turn on red light cameras

The Ohio Supreme Court declared a law restricting red light cameras unconstitutional Wednesday, a decision that will impact Springfield and 8 million drivers statewide. The court ruled 5 to 2 in case brought by Dayton that a 2015 state law restricting the use of speed and red light cameras hampered cities’ home-rule authority, which allows municipalities...
Cities can turn red light cameras back on, court rules; state threatens to fight back
Cities can turn red light cameras back on, court rules; state threatens to fight back

The Ohio Supreme Court said in a 5-2 decision issued Wednesday that the 2015 state law that makes it all but impossible for local governments to use traffic cameras is unconstitutional because it conflicts with cities’ home-rule authority. The decision impacts Ohio’s 8 million licensed drivers, gives cities the green-light to start using...
Mad River Twp. residents urge Clark County to fight mining lawsuit
Mad River Twp. residents urge Clark County to fight mining lawsuit

Mad River Twp. residents urged Clark County commissioners to fight a lawsuit filed against it in federal court by a mining company seeking to bypass a local zoning board. About 20 Mad River Twp. residents and members of the group Citizens Against Mining attended the commission meeting held at the Clark County Fair on Tuesday to speak against Enon Sand...
Ohio executes Ronald Phillips; first execution in 3 years
Ohio executes Ronald Phillips; first execution in 3 years

For the first time in more than three years, the state of Ohio has executed a death row inmate. State officials executed Ronald Phillips by lethal injection this morning officially at 10:43 a.m. at a state prison in Lucasville, about 80 miles south of Columbus. The execution ended a lull following an unusually drawn-out execution that relied on a controversial...
More Stories