Judge to retire after 22 years at Clark County Juvenile Court


Clark County Juvenile Court Judge Joseph Monnin will retire this month after serving more than 22 years on the bench.

Monnin’s retirement will be effective June 30. After two decades at the court, Monnin’s decision came down to a number of factors, he said, including a desire to do other things, face new challenges and visit extended family.

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“I’m truly honored and blessed to be able to have this job,” said Monnin, 62. “I took it seriously and I enjoy what I do. I hope that I’ve made a difference in the lives of a few children. I like my co-workers and I’m proud of what we do here at the juvenile court.”

Monnin’s term won’t expire until the end of 2018. Gov. John Kasich is expected to appoint his successor to fill the remainder of his term.

Monnin is anxious for a replacement to be named so he can help that person make a smooth transition, he said.

“I’m hoping it will be someone who has a keen interest in juvenile justice,” Monnin said. “What we do is very different than the adult system. It takes a commitment and some dedication to this particular area of the law.”

The juvenile court, a division of the Clark County Common Pleas Court, has more than 80 employees, he said. He’s in charge of both the juvenile clerk of court’s office and the detention center, which employs cooks, teachers, bailiffs, stenographers and other administrative positions.

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It has seen a plethora of changes since Monnin took over in 1996.

“We didn’t have a computer in the building when I started,” Monnin said, “and now we’re paperless or close to it.”

The court has also recently made upgrades to its facilities, he said, including an addition and renovation of its existing space.

“We’re secure, neat, clean and timely,” Monnin said. “I think we do a good job for the citizens.”

Monnin, a graduate of Catholic Central High School, St. Joseph’s College and Villanova College of Law, doesn’t plan to practice law or serve as a judge again, he said. He also has no desire to run for another public office.

“I think can contribute many other things to our community without being in the courtroom,” Monnin said.

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