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Governments improve response time to records requests


By Andrew Welsh-Huggins

Associated Press

COLUMBUS — Public employees asked to provide common records during a statewide test of Ohio’s open records laws in April followed the law in nine of every 10 requests, according to audit results that found much higher compliance than a similar survey a decade ago.

Records requested included meeting minutes, a mayor’s budget, school superintendents’ pay, police chief pay and police incident reports.

“It’s a meaningful improvement over what was found 10 years ago,” said Dennis Hetzel, executive director of the Ohio Newspaper Association.

The audit was sponsored by the Ohio Coalition for Open Government of ONA. It began April 21 and, in most counties, was completed within days.

Newspaper, television and radio reporters served as auditors in all 88 Ohio counties. Auditors didn’t identify themselves as reporters when making requests to ensure the same experience as a typical citizen seeking public records.

Overall, 90 percent of requests were granted either immediately, over time or with some conditions, compared with 70 percent a decade ago, according to audit results. Successful requests for superintendents’ compensation and school treasurers’ phone bills saw the biggest jumps, with compliance rising from about one of every two requests to nine of every 10 requests this year.

An “impressive compliance with the law,” reported an auditor who received the salary of the Medina police chief almost immediately, along with an explanation of how it was calculated. It was “probably one of the easiest times I’ve ever had obtaining public records from a government agency that wasn’t familiar with me,” the auditor noted.

“Cooperative and flexible,” reported another auditor of a secretary at Ashland schools who, while initially confused by the request for the superintendent’s salary, quickly provided it on further explanation.

Not every encounter went smoothly. A clerk filled a request for county commissioners’ meeting minutes in Clinton County but summoned a sheriff’s deputy after the auditor declined to give his name. Several school districts required auditors to fill out a public records request form, a violation of Ohio law which does not require a written request, identification or the reason for the request.

The attorney general’s office, which conducts mandatory three-hour public records training for Ohio elected officials, regularly reminds officials of the law regarding requests, said Damian Sikora, chief of the office’s Constitutional Offices Section.

“Sometimes there’s a little bit of a disconnect between some of the people taking the request and the office holders themselves,” he said.

State Auditor David Yost, whose office randomly samples municipalities’ open records compliance, said he was troubled not to see 100 percent compliance with requests for things such as a superintendent’s compensation or police chief’s pay.


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