You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and interactive features. Starting at just 99c for 8 weeks.

X

Welcome to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Your source for Clark and Champaign counties’ hometown news. All readers have free access to a limited number of stories every month.

If you are a News-Sun subscriber, please take a moment to login for unlimited access.

Keep little ghosts and goblins safe

Tips cover candy and reflective wear; to dodge calories, try options such as toys, pencils


It's fun and, next to Christmas, it is one of the most exciting holidays for children.

But Halloween, which falls this year on a Monday, is also a dangerous time and — in many instances — can be fatal.

"Children 15 and under are four times more likely to be killed than at any other time of the year," said Beverly Losman, manager of Injury Prevention at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and director of Safe Kids Georgia, a statewide network of health educators who work to prevent unintentional injury. "They are running to and fro, they fall, and drivers often do not see them."

Losman said parents should watch out for tainted candy, be weary of potentially hazardous costumes and take precautions to make sure their child is visible, especially to drivers.

"We recommend reflective tape either to their costume or Halloween bag," she said.

Home safety, driver safety and pedestrian safety, Losman said, are all key to having a fun and safe Halloween.

While parents are implementing the safety tips, experts suggest that they have a game plan to keep kids healthy as well — especially because childhood obesity is a growing concern.

"No one wants to take the fun out of trick-or-treating, so children should be allowed to have some treats," Losman said. "But it's always a good idea to plan ahead and provide sweets in moderation."

Safety

Avoid costumes with excessive fabric, such as capes or sleeves. Loose clothing can easily brush up against a jack-o'-lantern or other open flame, causing your child's costume to catch on fire.

Make sure costumes fit properly. Oversize costumes and footwear, such as clown or adult shoes, can cause a child to trip and fall. Avoid wearing hats that can slide over the eyes.

Accessorize with flexible props, such as rubber swords or knives. Inflexible ones can cause serious injury in case of a fall.

Apply only nontoxic and hypoallergenic paint or cosmetics to the face. If a mask is worn, be certain it fits securely and cut eye holes large enough for full vision.

If possible, choose brightly colored costumes that drivers can spot easily.

Always supervise children younger than 13 and attach their name, address and phone number (including area code) to their clothes in case they get separated from adults. Older children should trick-or-treat in a group, and a curfew should be established. Have each child carry a cell phone or some loose change in case they get lost or need to call home.

Children should go only to well-lit houses and remain on the porch within street view. Teach your child to cross the street at crosswalks or intersections; never cross between parked cars and always look both ways before crossing. Remind your child to stay on the sidewalk, if possible, and to walk facing traffic. Use flashlights when trick-or-treating in the dark.

Remind your child not to eat any treats before you've had a chance to examine them thoroughly for holes and punctures. Throw away all treats that are homemade or unwrapped. To help prevent your children from munching, give them a snack or light meal before they go trick-or-treating.

Parents of food-allergic children must read every candy label in their child's Halloween bag to avoid a potentially life-threatening situation.

Nutrition, wellness

Provide a nutritious meal that includes fruits and vegetables before going to gather candy. This will lower your child's appetite for sweets.

Call around the neighborhood and aim for neighbors who will be giving out non-food items such as pencils, erasers and safe child toys.

Separate candy as soon as you return home and take out what you will allow your child to eat in a week or two and share the rest with other kids in the neighborhood or kids who may not have participated in the festivities.

Allow the child to eat things such as chocolate and hard candies versus chewy and gummy foods because they are easier to brush off the teeth.

Provide water with snacks and candies as well as set aside time to be active to help burn the extra calories consumed.

Source: Children's Healthcare of Atlanta


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in

Tuna, star of the Amazing Acro-Cats, dies of cancer
Tuna, star of the Amazing Acro-Cats, dies of cancer

The cowbell won't sound quite the same now that Tuna, the star of the Amazing Acro-Cats cat circus, has died.Happy Cats Haven posted the news Friday on its Facebook page: "To all our fans of Tuna and The Rock Cats and the Amazing Acro-Cats, it's with many tears that we let you know that Samantha Martin's star kitty Tuna crossed the Rainbow Bridge...
7 small changes that will have a big impact
7 small changes that will have a big impact

It’s only a few weeks into 2017, but you’ve already come to an uncomfortable and familiar realization. New Year’s resolutions result in more guilt and depression than achievement. Forget about the big aspirations for a transformational do-over. They don’t work. How about making some small changes today that eventually can have...
Let’s have a cheer for the Amherst Hamsters
Let’s have a cheer for the Amherst Hamsters

Amherst, a tiny college of 1,795 really smart scholars in Massachusetts, made news last year when the board of trustees voted to drop Lord Jeffs as its athletic teams’ unofficial mascot. Lord Jeffery Amherst, historians discovered, was not necessarily a nice person. The 18th century British general reportedly once suggested giving smallpox-infested...
Stark numbers show heroin’s local grip
Stark numbers show heroin’s local grip

An average of seven Montgomery County residents a day were treated for drug overdoses by emergency departments in 2016, and one person alone made eight trips to the ER. Eleven people were treated twice in the same day for overdoses. The stark figures — amassed largely due to a devastating heroin epidemic — are found in a new Public Health...
After a cesarean, some women can have a vaginal birth

Premier HealthNet is one of the largest groups of pediatrics, family medicine, internal medicine, and urgent care practices in southwest Ohio. For more information, go online to www.premierhealthnet.com/news. Birthing a baby can be a long, painful process, but for many women the experience fulfills a deep emotional longing as a new mom. A vaginal birth...
More Stories