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Health


'Superbug' fungus new menace in US hospitals, mostly NY, NJ

A 'superbug' fungus is emerging as a new menace in U.S. hospitals, mostly in New York and New Jersey. First identified in Japan in 2009, the fungus has spread to more than a dozen countries around the globe. The oldest of the 66 cases reported in the U.S. dates back to 2013, but most were reported in the last year. The fungus called Candida auris is a harmful form of yeast. Scientists say it can be...
Environmentalists sue government for Lake Erie's toxic algae

Environmentalists sue government for Lake Erie's toxic algae

Environmental groups in Ohio and Michigan sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday, accusing it of dragging its feet on protecting Lake Erie from harmful algae that have fouled drinking water supplies in recent years. The federal lawsuit said the agency's lack of action is delaying steps that could combat the algae blooms in the shallowest of the Great Lakes. The sometimes toxic algae...
FDA: Avoid fake 'miracle' cancer treatments sold on internet

FDA: Avoid fake 'miracle' cancer treatments sold on internet

U.S. regulators are warning consumers to avoid 65 bogus products hawked on the internet with false claims that they can cure, treat, diagnose or prevent cancer. The Food and Drug Administration says these products , mostly sold on websites and social media sites, can be harmful, waste money and result in people not getting approved, effective treatments. The pills, creams and teas are untested and...
Hope for preemies as artificial womb helps tiny lambs grow

Hope for preemies as artificial womb helps tiny lambs grow

Researchers are creating an artificial womb to improve care for extremely premature babies — and remarkable animal testing suggests the first-of-its-kind watery incubation so closely mimics mom that it just might work. Today, premature infants weighing as little as a pound are hooked to ventilators and other machines inside incubators. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is aiming for a gentler...
Woman claims Fitbit burned her arm after it ‘exploded’

Woman claims Fitbit burned her arm after it ‘exploded’

A Wisconsin woman said she suffered second-degree burns on her arm after her Fitbit tracker “exploded” while she read a book, ABC News reported. >> Read more trending news  Dina Mitchell said she had owned her Fitbit Flex 2 for about two weeks when the fitness tracking device allegedly caught fire on her arm Tuesday night. "I was literally just sitting and reading...
Hardball health care option may cost Trump and taxpayers

Hardball health care option may cost Trump and taxpayers

Counting down to a budget deadline, the White House has toyed with a hardball health care tactic to force Democrats to yield on President Donald Trump's priorities. The administration just might eliminate billions of dollars in disputed "Obamacare" subsidies. But a study out Tuesday from a nonpartisan group suggests that could backfire. Stopping the Affordable Care Act payments at issue...
Trailblazing Colorado abortion law marks 50th anniversary

Trailblazing Colorado abortion law marks 50th anniversary

Tuesday marks 50 years since a groundbreaking Colorado law significantly loosened tight restrictions on legal abortions. Before the law, Colorado — like many states — allowed abortions only if a woman's life was at stake. In 1967, a Democratic freshman state lawmaker introduced a bill that allowed abortions if the woman's physical or mental health was threatened, if the unborn child might...
Overcoming Opioids: Special schools help teens stay clean

Overcoming Opioids: Special schools help teens stay clean

When Logan Snyder got hooked on pills after a prescription to treat pain from a kidney stone, she joined the millions already swept up in the nation's grim wave of addiction to opioid painkillers. She was just 14. Youth is a drawback when it comes to kicking drugs. Only half of U.S. treatment centers accept teenagers and even fewer offer teen-focused groups or programs. After treatment, adolescents...
What’s under your feet at the playground?

What’s under your feet at the playground?

The playground: a universal source of fun for children. It’s also a place to burn calories, make new friends and develop skills like how to judge risks and make decisions. A good playground challenges and engages children but is also designed to keep them safe. One of the best ways to lower the chances of serious injuries is to make sure there is safe surfacing under and around the equipment...
State cracking down on lead hazards in homes

State cracking down on lead hazards in homes

There are hundreds of homes in Ohio that have paint and other entities that are poisoning children with lead and state health officials want them left unoccupied until abatement issues are addressed. The Ohio Department of Health is working to compile a list of residential properties across the state that have unaddressed lead hazards. They are also urging local health departments in Butler, Clark...
Justices weigh defendants' right to own mental health expert

Justices weigh defendants' right to own mental health expert

The Supreme Court seemed closely divided Monday about whether an Alabama death row inmate should get a new sentencing hearing because he did not have a mental health expert on his side when he was tried and sentenced to death more than 30 years ago. The court has ruled previously that poor defendants whose mental health might be a factor in the criminal charges they are facing have a right to an expert's...
Nurse midwives help women beyond childbirth

Nurse midwives help women beyond childbirth

Stacy Hudepohl hopes to expand the perception that certified nurse midwives simply exist to help women through natural childbirth. “A midwife is very similar to a nurse practitioner in that we care for women throughout their entire lifespan,” said Ms. Hudepohl, a certified nurse midwife, who practices with the Center for Women’s Health & Wellness in Mason. “We care for young...
Biking, blading and boarding? Protect yourself

Biking, blading and boarding? Protect yourself

With spring in full swing, you’re probably heading outside with your friends and family to spend time bicycling, in-line skating or skateboarding. But before you head outside, make sure you take a few safety precautions to avoid common problems that will land you in the ER. “Each year we see injuries associated with biking, in-line skating and skateboarding that include head injuries,...
Springfield dad arrested after baby overdoses, revived with Narcan

Springfield dad arrested after baby overdoses, revived with Narcan

A Springfield man has been charged with endangering children after his 1-year-old son appears to have overdoses and was revived with Narcan — a trend Clark County leaders say is happening more often as the epidemic deepens. Samuel J. Mosley, 38, was arrested Friday and pleaded not guilty Monday to the third-degree felony charge in court. He faces a possible one to five years in prison if convicted...
Florida mother of 7 donates kidney to co-worker

Florida mother of 7 donates kidney to co-worker

VENICE, Fla. — A 45-year-old Florida mother of seven donated one of her kidneys to a 26-year-old co-worker, the Sarasota Herald Tribune reported. >> Read more trending news “I said, heck, he can have one of mine,” Christine Higbee said. “I have seven kids — if I need one, I can borrow one of theirs.” Higbee donated her kidney to Zack Pacyna, who has worked...
New program seeks to reach Clark County overdose patients, save lives

New program seeks to reach Clark County overdose patients, save lives

A new program set to launch next month will allow overdose patients to receive immediate help from a mental health professional at the emergency room, which local health leaders say could save lives. The warm hand-off program will place a licensed chemical dependency therapist and a peer support recovery specialist at the emergency room at Springfield Regional Medical Center to speak with addicts...
3 African countries chosen to test 1st malaria vaccine

3 African countries chosen to test 1st malaria vaccine

Three African countries have been chosen to test the world's first malaria vaccine, the World Health Organization announced Monday. Ghana, Kenya and Malawi will begin piloting the injectable vaccine next year with hundreds of thousands of young children, who have been at highest risk of death. The vaccine, which has partial effectiveness, has the potential to save tens of thousands of lives if used...
Clark County receives mixed results for air quality

Clark County receives mixed results for air quality

Clark County received mixed results on its air quality, according to a recent report from the American Lung Association. The county received an F grade for its ozone quality, but received an A grade for short-term particle pollution, according to the Association’s State of the Air 2017 report. RELATED: Springfield leader wants lifetime warranty on hazardous waste cleanup Clark County received...
Beloved school crossing guard begins fight with cancer after losing mom, sister to disease

Beloved school crossing guard begins fight with cancer after losing mom, sister to disease

A beloved crossing guard is saying goodbye to her students, for now, as she begins a battle with cancer. Sanjuana Torres has been a part-time crossing guard at the Rusk School in Houston, Texas, for 30 years. She knows just about every child’s name, and they love her. “She’s family. She’s everything. She was our first friend,” one student told KHOU. Torres recently...
Springfield groups ready for second Minority Health Fair

Springfield groups ready for second Minority Health Fair

Organizers of the second annual Minority Health Fair hope this year’s event is as successful as the first. More than 200 people attended the event last year, according to NAACP President Denise D. Williams. Four participants, however, are etched into Williams’ memory still. A LOOK BACK: First minority health fair planned “I believe we had the mammogram bus, and we...
Trump Health Dept. dismisses Obama appointed surgeon general

Trump Health Dept. dismisses Obama appointed surgeon general

The Trump administration has relieved Dr. Vivek Murthy of his duties as U.S. Surgeon General. A spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services says Murthy was asked to resign after "assisting in a smooth transition" under President Donald Trump. Murthy was a holdover from the Obama administration. Murthy's deputy, Rear Admiral Sylvia Trent-Adams, is serving as acting surgeon...
Possible shutdown, health care quagmire awaiting Congress

Possible shutdown, health care quagmire awaiting Congress

Lawmakers returning to Washington this coming week will find a familiar quagmire on health care legislation and a budget deadline dramatized by the prospect of a protracted battle between President Donald Trump and Democrats over his border wall. Trump's GOP allies control Congress, but they've been unable to send him a single major bill as his presidency faces the symbolic 100-day mark on April 29...

FDA approves 2nd near-copy of Remicade for immune disorders

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Renflexis, developed by Samsung Bioepis Co. of South Korea. Its U.S. partner, Merck & Co. of Kenilworth, New Jersey, will market Renflexis. Merck said Renflexis should be available in six months. The delay is required under U.S. regulations for a relatively new category called biosimilars. That's the industry term for generic but not quite identical versions...

FDA approves near-copy of Remicade for immune disorders

The Food and Drug Administration said Friday that it approved Renflexis, developed by Samsung Bioepis Co. of South Korea. It will be marketed by its U.S. partner, Merck & Co. of Kenilworth, New Jersey. The companies refused to disclose the list price. Without insurance, Remicade generally costs more than $30,000 annually for adults; dosage varies with the patient's weight. Merck said Renflexis should...
Study: Diet drinks can lead to stroke, dementia

Study: Diet drinks can lead to stroke, dementia

Diet sodas — one of America's favorite caffeine-delivery systems — appears to be just as unhealthy as their sugary cousins The Washington Post reports that a new study refutes the theory that diet drinks are a better option than those made with sugar or corn syrup. The new study in the journal Stroke says people who drink diet soda are three times as likely as those who don&rsquo...

Italy upholds vaccine requirements for preschoolers

Italy's top administrative body has rejected a challenge to mandatory vaccines for children attending preschool. Health Minister Beatrice Lorenzin hailed Friday's decision by the Council of State. Two families from Trieste, in northeastern Italy, had challenged the town's requirement that children ages 6 and below receive mandatory vaccines before attending day care or preschool classes that are run...

Judge: Parents of boy hurt by forceps delivery get $42M

The Thursday verdict by U.S. District Judge Sylvia Rambo in Harrisburg came after a six-day trial in September on claims by a Chambersburg couple, Christiana Late and Nathan Armolt. Their 5-year-old son, identified only as D.A. in court documents, understands language but can't speak, read or write and will eventually have to use a motorized wheelchair. The couple sued the federal government for errors...
Indian public health group loses permit for foreign funds

Indian public health group loses permit for foreign funds

India's government has canceled permission for foreign funding for one of the country's main public health organizations, whose donors include the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. It's the latest move by Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government in cracking down on charities and nonprofits that receive funds from overseas and are often criticized for working against national interests. Rajeev Chhibber...
Researchers to look for CTE evidence in Hernandez's brain

Researchers to look for CTE evidence in Hernandez's brain

Boston University researchers will study Aaron Hernandez's brain to determine if the former NFL star suffered from the same degenerative brain disease as Hall of Famer Junior Seau and former Bears defensive back Dave Duerson, who also took their own lives. Hernandez hanged himself in prison early Wednesday, days after winning an acquittal in a 2012 double homicide case. He was already serving a life...
Lawmakers revisiting requiring those on Medicaid to work

Lawmakers revisiting requiring those on Medicaid to work

A simple question — should adults who are able to work be required to do so to get taxpayer-provided health insurance? — could lead to major changes in the social safety net. The federal-state Medicaid program for low-income and disabled people covers more than 70 million U.S. residents — about 1 in 5 — including an increasing number of working-age adults. In a break from past...
Future of revamped health care bill remains dubious in House

Future of revamped health care bill remains dubious in House

President Donald Trump on Friday downplayed the significance of pushing Republican health care legislation through the House next week, a retreat from more bullish White House pronouncements a day earlier, which had gotten a skeptical reception at the Capitol. In brief comments to reporters Friday, Trump said the attempt to rekindle the GOP drive to repeal President Barack Obama's health care law...
Germ in raw milk, poultry now tops food poisoning list

Germ in raw milk, poultry now tops food poisoning list

The U.S. government's latest report card on food poisoning suggests that a germ commonly linked to raw milk and poultry is surpassing salmonella at the top of the culprit list. The report counts cases in only 10 states for nine of the most common causes of foodborne illness, but is believed to be a good indicator of national food poisoning trends. Highlights from Thursday's report from the Centers...

Jury sides with Petco in death of boy from rat-bite fever

A San Diego jury has sided with Petco in a lawsuit brought by the family of a 10-year-old boy who died after contracting an illness from bacteria from a rat purchased from the retailer. KNSD-TV and KFMB-TV report that the jury found Thursday that Petco was not negligent or liable in the death of Aidan Pankey on June 12, 2013, after he was rushed to a hospital with severe stomach pains. The San Diego...
FDA further restricts pain medication use in kids

FDA further restricts pain medication use in kids

U.S. regulators are strengthening warnings about the dangers of two types of powerful painkillers due to risks of slowed breathing and death. The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday it is requiring makers of prescription versions of the medicines, codeine and tramadol, to change the products' labels to warn against giving them to children under age 12, and to limit use in older children. The...

Italian court finds link between cell phone use and tumor

A longtime Telecom Italia employee has been awarded monthly social security payments after a court found that his brain tumor was caused by improper use of a company-issued cellphone. Lawyer Stefano Bertone said Thursday that it was the first trial court verdict of which he was aware in the world "to recognize a link between cellphone use and the development of brain tumor." Bertone said...
Under Trump, states may demand work for Medicaid

Under Trump, states may demand work for Medicaid

Work requirements for Medicaid could lead to major changes in the social safety net under President Donald Trump. It sounds like a simple question: Should adults who are able to work be required to do so to get taxpayer provided health insurance? The federal-state Medicaid program for low-income and disabled people covers more than 70 million U.S. residents — about 1 in 5 — including an...
AP Exclusive: Pesticide maker tries to kill risk study

AP Exclusive: Pesticide maker tries to kill risk study

Dow Chemical is pushing a Trump administration open to scrapping regulations to ignore the findings of federal scientists who point to a family of widely used pesticides as harmful to about 1,800 critically threatened or endangered species. Lawyers representing Dow, whose CEO is a close adviser to Trump, and two other manufacturers of organophosphates sent letters last week to the heads of three of...
VA Choice program extended, allows veterans more care options

VA Choice program extended, allows veterans more care options

The VA is working to replace the VA Choice Program with a less cumbersome approach to allow veterans to receive services more easily from private health care providers, a top agency official says. The work on a replacement comes as President Donald Trump signed legislation Wednesday that extended the program beyond an Aug. 7, three-year sunset date until the remaining funds are depleted. In 2014,...
EPA chief makes first Superfund site visit with Indiana stop

EPA chief makes first Superfund site visit with Indiana stop

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency toured an Indiana public-housing complex on Wednesday where roughly 1,000 people were ordered evacuated because of lead contamination, his first visit to a Superfund site that some environmental advocates called a major leadership test. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt joined Indiana leaders including Gov. Eric Holcomb, U.S. Sens. Joe Donnelly and Todd...
Microsoft's Gates appeals to Britain to maintain foreign aid

Microsoft's Gates appeals to Britain to maintain foreign aid

Microsoft founder Bill Gates appealed Wednesday for Britain's leaders to maintain current levels of foreign aid, saying that it is a good investment for both the U.K. and the world. Speaking to an audience of lawmakers, diplomats and aid workers at the Royal United Services Institute, Gates sought to counter recent arguments that Britain is wasting money abroad and should instead focus on problems...
Trump extends private-sector health care program for vets

Trump extends private-sector health care program for vets

President Donald Trump signed a bill Wednesday to temporarily extend a program that lets some veterans seek medical care in the private sector, part of an effort by the president to deliver on a campaign promise. The extension will give Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin time to develop a more comprehensive plan to allow veterans to more easily go outside the VA health system for care. Under...
Teen's donated organs, tissues have helped 194 people

Teen's donated organs, tissues have helped 194 people

The grieving parents of a teenager in Iowa who died in 2016 are taking comfort that their son has been able to help so many people through organ donation. Drew Lienemann, 18, died in January 2016 from injuries sustained in a suicide attempt two days prior, according to his parent's account to KCCI. The Lienemanns went public with their son's suicide in hopes of helping other teens going through...

Dental clinic where children got infections can reopen

A Southern California dental clinic where nearly 70 kids contracted serious infections has received permission from health officials to reopen. Children's Dental Group in Anaheim has been closed for four months after dozens of young patients were sickened following pulpotomies, or baby tooth root canals. The Orange County Register reported Tuesday (http://bit.ly/2o3AMFR) that the clinic will reopen...
10-year-old who lost leg to cancer gets gift that makes her feel understood

10-year-old who lost leg to cancer gets gift that makes her feel understood

A 10-year-old girl battling cancer is cherishing a gift after her leg was amputated because of cancer. Dylan Probe of Houston, Texas, was diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma, a type of bone cancer, after doctors discovered a tumor on her right heel last year. Dylan has always been active. Before she turned 10, she completed three triathlons, KHOU reports. Losing her leg was difficult, but she has...

Iowa lawmakers OK 20-week abortion ban, 3-day wait period

Iowa legislators sent Gov. Terry Branstad a measure Tuesday that would ban most abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy and impose a 72-hour waiting period on women seeking the procedure, a move highlighting the state's conservative shift since the November election. The Republican-majority state Senate voted 30-20 along party lines for the legislation, after the GOP-led House approved it earlier this...
Hazardous chemical found in Enon home prompts evacuation, cleanup

Hazardous chemical found in Enon home prompts evacuation, cleanup

Residents of an Enon house were removed from their home after mercury was found inside. The incident happened Thursday while the residents were cleaning out the garage. The female resident was sweeping, said James Justice with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and she saw silvery liquid on the floor. RELATED : Opposition grows against mining permit in Mad River Twp. She called 9-1-1, and the...

Theranos agrees to pay $4.65 million in Arizona refunds

Embattled blood testing company Theranos, Inc. has agreed to pay $4.65 million to cover full refunds for every Arizona customer who used the company's testing services, Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich announced Tuesday. The settlement with the Palo Alto, California-based company covers more than 175,000 Arizonans who paid for blood tests between 2013 and the suspension of Theranos services...
Feds practice Ebola evacuations despite past Trump criticism

Feds practice Ebola evacuations despite past Trump criticism

Donald Trump railed against President Barack Obama's decision to bring patients with Ebola to the United States for treatment in 2014. Now that Trump is president, his administration is preparing for similar, and possibly larger-scale, evacuations. The State Department and Department of Health and Human Services said Tuesday they led an unprecedented inter-agency drill last week to test their preparedness...
Sharp-eyed school nurse saves boy after noticing signs of deadly leukemia  

Sharp-eyed school nurse saves boy after noticing signs of deadly leukemia  

A sharp-eyed school nurse in New Jersey is credited with saving a young boy’s life after noticing the kindergartener had signs of leukemia. Nathan Campbell started school last fall in Camden County at Zane North Elementary School. His teacher took him to the nurse’s office after the little boy said he didn’t want to go outside and play, because his leg was hurting, according...
More than 500,000 inhalers recalled by pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline

More than 500,000 inhalers recalled by pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline

British pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline has announced a recall of more than 593,000 asthma inhalers in the United States because of a defect that may affect the doses delivered. Reuters reported that the inhalers are being recalled from hospitals, pharmacies, retailers and wholesalers. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a voluntary level II recall of some  Ventolin...
Bathe and burn, baths as good as 30-minute walks

Bathe and burn, baths as good as 30-minute walks

  Soaking in a hot tub is just as beneficial to your health as a 30-minute walk. That’s the conclusion of a new British study comparing bathing to exercise. Researchers at the U.K.’s Loughborough University measured study participants’ blood sugar levels and calories burned when taking an hour-long hot bath or biking for an hour. They discovered that while taking a...
Greene County flu cases increased in 2017, officials say

Greene County flu cases increased in 2017, officials say

Employees at the Greene County Combined Health District say the normal flu season usually starts in October, and is over by March. But not this year. “I have four babies, all under 6 (years old), and they’re all sick,” Xenia resident Victoia McDaniel said Tuesday. About 130 Greene County residents have been hospitalized for the flu since mid-December, health district officials said...
Effort underway to ban smoking on Veterans Affairs sites across U.S.

Effort underway to ban smoking on Veterans Affairs sites across U.S.

An Ohio congressman has targeted smoking at Department of Veterans Affairs medical clinics and campuses nationwide. U.S. Rep. Brad Wenstrup, an Iraq war veteran and a doctor, has introduced House legislation that would immediately ban smoking inside VA health care clinics and hospitals and outdoors within five years. “Exposure to second hand smoke puts veteran patients at unnecessary risk,&rdquo...
Man's strep throat takes rare turn, leads to quadruple amputation

Man's strep throat takes rare turn, leads to quadruple amputation

A Michigan man is lucky to be alive after he contracted a rare case of strep throat, but he still is facing a life-changing recovery.Kevin Breen began experiencing symptoms around Christmas. Severe abdominal pain and flu-like symptoms were initially diagnosed as mild pancreatitis, but Breen was not responding to treatment. Doctors, concerned by his rapidly deteriorating condition, performed exploratory...
Children lose both parents to cancer within days of each other

Children lose both parents to cancer within days of each other

After losing both parents to cancer within days of each other, a group of siblings are thanking strangers around the world for their support. The Bennett family’s heartbreaking story went viral when 21-year-old Luke, 18-year-old Hannah and 13-year-old Oliver, released a heartbreaking photo of their parents online. The photo showed parents Mike and Julie Bennett holding hands at a hospital in...
Has your doctor been up for 24 hours? Rule change will allow it for new residents

Has your doctor been up for 24 hours? Rule change will allow it for new residents

New guidelines by the organization that oversees medical residency programs for new doctors in the United States will soon allow first-year residents to work shifts as long as 24 hours, eight hours more than the current limit. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, or ACGME, announced Friday that new doctors in their first year of residency can work 80 hours a week starting on July...
Cancer pill could keep patients alive for more than 10 years, new study finds

Cancer pill could keep patients alive for more than 10 years, new study finds

Before cancer drug imatinib mesylate, sold under the name Gleevec, a diagnosis for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) "amounted to a death sentence," according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute. Now, the drug could keep its patients alive for 10 years or longer, a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine Thursday found. Data from the global study...
Report: Montgomery County's infant mortality rate among worst in Ohio

Report: Montgomery County's infant mortality rate among worst in Ohio

Black infants are three times more likely to die before their first birthday than white babies, according to a report from Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County. Montgomery County has the fifth worst infant mortality rate in Ohio, according to the report, which was released early this year.  White babies have an infant mortality rate of 4.5 per 1,000 live births, whereas black children have...
Lyme disease: What is it and how to avoid it

Lyme disease: What is it and how to avoid it

Lyme disease is a debilitating disease that is spread through the bite of the blacklegged tick, also known as the deer tick, and the western blacklegged tick. The tick catches the bacteria from mice and transmits it to humans. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates as many as 300,000 infections occur every year in the spring and summer. People living in the Northeast, the mid-Atlantic...
Lyme disease risks could increase after mouse plague, experts warn

Lyme disease risks could increase after mouse plague, experts warn

A mouse plague in the northeast Hudson River Valley in 2016 could fuel an increase in Lyme disease this year, two leading experts are warning. New York ecologists Felicia Keesing and her husband, Rick Ostfeld, have studied the disease for two decades. “We’re anticipating 2017 to be a particularly risky year for Lyme,” Ostfeld said in an interview with NPR. The two ecologists have...
Study: Obesity linked to 11 types of cancer as overweight population grows

Study: Obesity linked to 11 types of cancer as overweight population grows

Obesity is strongly linked to the development of 11 types of cancers, including breast, kidney, rectum, colon, and pancreatic cancer, scientists warned in a new study. The research on excess body fat and cancer, published in the British Medical Journal, reviewed more than 200 studies on cancer and obesity and found “strong evidence” of a connection between increased body fat and 11 cancers...
Mental health professionals, advocates discuss resources for transgender community

Mental health professionals, advocates discuss resources for transgender community

Mental health care professionals teamed up Friday with advocates to talk about issues surrounding mental health care and resources for the transgender community. In 2014, a teenager who said she felt trapped in a male’s body killed herself when she walked in front of a moving semi in Warren County. Leelah Alcorn, 17, born Joshua Alcorn, said her family would not accept her gender identity. News...
40,000+ pounds of veal recalled for possible E. coli contamination

40,000+ pounds of veal recalled for possible E. coli contamination

Ohio Farms Packing Co. is recalling more than 40,600 pounds of boneless veal products that may be contaminated with E. coli. Also included in the recall is an undetermined amount of veal cutlets, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Safety Inspection Service announced Thursday night. The cutlets were only sold to food services and not directly to consumers. The boneless veal products...
Exercise of the Month: Standing One Arm Row

Exercise of the Month: Standing One Arm Row

The Standing One Arm Row helps to strengthen muscles in the back, shoulders and arms. A strong back helps to keep the spinal column in proper alignment, improving posture and aiding in completion of everyday tasks with reduced injury risk. Primary Muscles Worked: Latissimus Dorsi (Lats), Rhomboids Secondary Muscles Worked: Trapezius, Erector Spinae, Rotator Cuff, Posterior Deltoids, Biceps, Obliques...
Heroin, other drugs killing Ohioans in record numbers

Heroin, other drugs killing Ohioans in record numbers

The number of people dying from heroin overdoses has tripled since 2010. In 2015, more than 52,000 people died from drug overdoses, according to data from the National Center for Health Statistics. Overdose deaths involving fentanyl and tramadol also increased, according to the data from 2015, the latest year available. The impact of the epidemic stretches past those who are struggling with addiction...
Florida doctor turns to Facebook to search for a kidney donor

Florida doctor turns to Facebook to search for a kidney donor

Dr. Stuart Himmelstein has spent the past four years anxiously waiting for a much-needed kidney, but like nearly 120,000 Americans on a transplant list, he's waiting on a miracle. So Himmelstein, a Delray Beach, Florida, internist diagnosed with kidney disease, is trying another approach for a transplant: Facebook. Himmelstein, a Lake Worth, Florida, resident and the former president...
Flu-related illness claims the life of a fifth child in Ohio

Flu-related illness claims the life of a fifth child in Ohio

A fifth child has died in Ohio from flu-related illness, the Ohio Department of Health confirmed Thursday. A 9-year-old Marion county boy was the latest pediatric death reported during the current flu season, which began last September and generally peaks at this time of year. All the child deaths, which are the only flu-related deaths reported to the health department, occurred this month. None have...
Overdose death review committees created to fight opioid epidemic

Overdose death review committees created to fight opioid epidemic

Governor John Kasich’s biennium budget calls for the creation of county overdose fatality review boards, a move aimed at giving local communities more tools to tackle the rising number of heroin and fentanyl overdose deaths. “It will help us get a greater insight into what may be causing the overdoses,” said Dan Suffoletto, spokesman for Public Health Dayton & Montgomery County....
Man warns others after wife dies from 'botched' plastic surgery

Man warns others after wife dies from 'botched' plastic surgery

After's his wife's death, a Gainesville, Georgia, man is warning women against traveling to South America for cheap plastic surgery. Diana Maria Alvarez, 36, went to her home country of Colombia in December to get liposuction on her stomach. Her husband, Dario Chavarro, said she died after what he called a botched surgery. He said the doctors convinced her to have more work done than she had...
Stop taking drugs for lower back pain and do this instead

Stop taking drugs for lower back pain and do this instead

If you're taking prescription drugs to deal with back pain, you might want to rethink your strategy. At least that's the latest recommendation in a new study from the American College of Physicians.  There are three types of lower back pain: acute, subacute, and chronic. Acute low back pain lasts less than four weeks, subacute lasts four to 12 weeks and chronic lasts more than 12 weeks. Folks...
Viral video helps teen battling cancer raise money for treatment: 'I don’t want to die'

Viral video helps teen battling cancer raise money for treatment: 'I don’t want to die'

A teenager battling cancer in Ireland is thanking strangers around the world for raising enough money to help her get treatment in Houston, Texas. Shauntelle Tynan, 18, shared a video on YouTube on Feb. 12 titled, "The Most Important Video I’ll Ever Make." "I don’t want to die," Tynan said through tears in the video. She said in the video that it is important for...
Nurse, 97, has no plans on retiring

Nurse, 97, has no plans on retiring

An age-defying nurse in New Jersey has no plans to retire, even at the age of 97. Kathryn Hodges, Emerson’s public health nurse, is a bit of a rock star in the town’s health care community, and for good reason. Hodges is New Jersey’s oldest practicing registered nurse, according to NorthJersey.com. In addition to performing her part-time nursing duties, Hodges walks unassisted and...
Formerly conjoined twins celebrate first birthday apart

Formerly conjoined twins celebrate first birthday apart

 Just two weeks after undergoing a successful separation surgery, formerly conjoined twin girls are celebrating their first birthday. Ballenie and Bellanie Camacho were born conjoined at the base of their spine on Feb. 4, 2016.  They underwent a groundbreaking separation surgery at Maria Fareri Children's Hospital in Valhalla, New York, last month, according to WPIX. The hospital shared...
CMHP releases mobile mammography schedule

CMHP releases mobile mammography schedule

The Community Mercy Health Partners’ Mobile Mammography program, which provides screening at multiple locations in Clark and Champaign counties each month, has scheduled stops at community locations in February. To register or for more information about these dates or availability at Springfield Regional Medical Center, call 937-523-9332 from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Friday...

Does government play a role in children eating healthy?

This week in a course I teach at the University of Dayton, I had students watch the documentary “Fed Up”. It highlights the childhood obesity epidemic and the many factors contributing to poor dietary behavior in children. The narrators look at factors such as individual eating behavior as well as the role of food industry and governmental policy in our food system. A major question I...

How to make sure you get a better night’s sleep

Chronic lack of sleep is linked to obesity, diabetes, heart disease and can affect mental health. Sleep requirements vary with age, with children needing more than adults. Current recommendations are seven to nine hours for ages 18 to 64, and seven to eight hours for those 65 and older. Many factors can influence sleep cycles, including diet, exercise, medications, drugs or alcohol, stress, sleep...
Local psychologist offers tips on talking to kids about school violence

Local psychologist offers tips on talking to kids about school violence

With many struggling to cope with today’s school shooting at West Liberty-Salem High School, a local psychologist has tips for parents as they respond to questions and concerns about school violence. "I think it's important to allow children to talk about any anxiety or concerns that they may be having," said Mary Beth DeWitt, PhD, of Dayton Children's Hospital.  Parents and caregivers...
Stark numbers show heroin’s local grip

Stark numbers show heroin’s local grip

An average of seven Montgomery County residents a day were treated for drug overdoses by emergency departments in 2016, and one person alone made eight trips to the ER. Eleven people were treated twice in the same day for overdoses. The stark figures — amassed largely due to a devastating heroin epidemic — are found in a new Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County report just sent to...
Woman makes Instagram account for amputated foot

Woman makes Instagram account for amputated foot

A cancer survivor from Oklahoma City has made the best of a bad situation in an interesting way. KOKH reported that Kristi Loyall, a survivor of cancer, had problems with her right foot for six years. "I kept going to the neurologist five or six more times he kept telling me it was a B-12 deficiency, so I kind of gave up on that until last summer I noticed a lump on the inside of my foot,"...
Cincinnati doctor, inventor of anti-choking Heimlich maneuver dies at 96

Cincinnati doctor, inventor of anti-choking Heimlich maneuver dies at 96

Dr. Henry Heimlich, the famed and controversial inventor of a namesake maneuver to help choking victims, died early today in Cincinnati, our media partner WCPO-TV reported. His family released a statement today that said Heimlich, 96, died at Christ Hospital after complications from a massive heart attack he suffered Monday at his home in Cincinnati’s Hyde Park neighborhood. The Cincinnati doctor...
Family hoping for miracle as daughter awaits double lung transplant

Family hoping for miracle as daughter awaits double lung transplant

She is a long way from home, she is very sick and time is running out "In the last 10 days she's basically been on life support," said Nick O'Hara. Ashland, Massachusetts native Caitlin O’Hara was diagnosed at the age of 2 with cystic fibrosis, a disease that primarily affects the lungs. Caitlin, now 33, desperately needs a double lung transplant. “Last week she was listed...
Exercise of the Month: Stability Ball Ab Roll

Exercise of the Month: Stability Ball Ab Roll

The Stability Ball Ab Roll is an excellent core exercise, working multiple muscle groups, particularly the abdominals and low back. Strong abdominal/low back muscles act as a natural ‘girdle,’ surrounding your entire waistline and protecting the spinal column and organs. Stability balls come in various sizes. The larger the ball, the easier this exercise will be to perform, whereas using...
New bill would let you buy hearing aids over the counter

New bill would let you buy hearing aids over the counter

Millions of Americans who need hearing aids do not have them, and fewer than 20 percent of people with hearing loss are getting help. A new bill could be music to their ears.  The legislation, introduced by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, would allow some hearing aids for people with mild and moderate hearing loss to be sold over the counter at local drugstores...

Is social media connected to eating disorders?

Many of us either love social media or try to escape from it but cannot. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and all the rest are ways to connect with friends and society, which may influence the way we behave and think. One area of recent research is the connection between social media and eating disorders. There are several different eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge...
Clinical trials underway to test effectiveness of ecstasy on PTSD patients

Clinical trials underway to test effectiveness of ecstasy on PTSD patients

MDMA commonly known as Molly or Ecstasy could soon be approved to treat post-traumatic stress disorder. The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new clinical trial of MDMA. We reached out to the FDA about the trial, a spokeswoman said, "We cannot discuss any specific drug trials. The drug companies or researchers can share information about their trials and discuss where they are in the...
World AIDS Day 2016: Officials push for testing, awareness

World AIDS Day 2016: Officials push for testing, awareness

Officials worldwide are pushing for HIV/AIDS awareness, testing and treatment access as health officials mark World Aids Day on Thursday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 36.7 million people across the globe are living with HIV/AIDS. The illnesses claim more than 1 million lives each year, the agency said. However, the World Health Organization noted that in 2015 the epidemic...
Eating bugs healthy alternative to beef, study suggests

Eating bugs healthy alternative to beef, study suggests

While it might leave some diners feeling squeamish, a new study suggests certain bugs are packed with nutrition. Insects have been studied as a potential food source for years. In 2013, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations released a report that identified more than 1,900 edible insect species. As the world’s population grows, scientists are on the hunt for sustainable...
These are the ‘fattest’ states in the country

These are the ‘fattest’ states in the country

On a scale of the nation's "fattest" states, Mississippi is ranked No. 1, according to WalletHub's latest ranking on "America's fattest states" in 2016. Analysts at the personal finance website came up with its list by pulling data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Conference of State Legislatures....
CDC: Kids continue to consume too much salt, putting them at risk

CDC: Kids continue to consume too much salt, putting them at risk

Parents might want to forget that pinch of salt -- children are still consuming too much and it could lead to serious health issues, federal officials said this week. A study released Thursday examined sodium intake for children between 6 and 18 years old. Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said packaged bakery and snack foods are a big problem. High levels of salt are being consumed...
US gets 'C' rating for premature birth rate

US gets 'C' rating for premature birth rate

The premature birth rate in the U.S. has risen for the first time in nearly a decade. “This is a problem for our entire country,” said Cynthia Pellegrini, with the March of Dimes Foundation. “It is alarming.” According to a March of Dimes survey, the premature birth rate went up from 9.57 to 9.63 in 2015. Researchers said that’s 2,000 more babies born prematurely...
Study shows 1 in 3 people unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics

Study shows 1 in 3 people unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics

A new report out by the Pew Charitable Research Fund and the Centers for Disease Control shows one in three people in 2015 were unnecessarily prescribed an antibiotic.  The second part of that report shows only half of patients, for three common infections, are getting the right kind of drug.   The study found 47 million prescriptions were given unnecessarily and the study's authors claim...

Medicare changes way doctors are paid

Changing the way it does business, Medicare recently unveiled a far-reaching overhaul of how it pays doctors and other clinicians. The goal is to reward quality, penalize poor performance, and avoid paying piecemeal for services. Whether it succeeds or fails, it’s one of the biggest changes in Medicare’s 50-year history. The complex regulation is nearly 2,400 pages long and will take years...

Poll finds majority of Americans want restraints on drug prices

By Jordan Rau, Kaiser Health News An overwhelming majority of Americans favor government action to restrain prescription drug prices, according to a poll recently released Eighty-two percent of those polled said they want Medicare to negotiate prices with the companies, which Congress does not allow. Seventy-eight percent favored limiting the amount companies can charge for high-cost drugs, such as...

Medicare enrollment period time for scammers

With Medicare open enrollment in full swing, it’s time to talk about protecting yourself from the crooks who use this period to steal from you. Medicare scams occur all the time, but the open-enrollment period is prime time for thieves to unleash their attempts to scam seniors. During open enrollment, which runs through Dec. 7, Medicare participants can change their health and prescription drug...

Did landmark laws from Congress enable high drug prices?

RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press Lawmakers are venting outrage over high prescription drug costs, but lawmakers and presidents of both parties may have set the stage for the startling prices that have consumers on edge. As the proverb says: Physician, heal thyself. In the last 13 years, Congress passed major legislation that expanded taxpayer-financed coverage for prescription drugs but lacked...

Enrollment period good time to discuss Social Security benefits

The Medicare open enrollment period is the perfect time to talk about Medicare prescriptions and the ‘extra help’ available from Social Security. Newly eligible Medicare beneficiaries and current beneficiaries, who are considering changes to their Medicare Part D (prescription drug coverage) plan, should act now. The Medicare open enrollment period runs through Dec. 7. The Medicare Part...

Tips for Medicare: Get to know the lingo

Unless you understand how Medicare is structured, you may not be able to make good decisions about what you’re buying. These are some of the terms you might see: › Part A of traditional Medicare covers inpatient hospital services, skilled nursing home care and hospice, among other things. › Part B of traditional Medicare helps cover preventive care and physician and outpatient...
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