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California lawmakers propose health coverage for immigrants

California, flush with cash from an expanding economy, would eventually spend $1 billion a year to provide health care to immigrants living in the state illegally under a proposal announced Wednesday by Democratic lawmakers. The proposal would eliminate legal residency requirements in California's Medicaid program, known as Medi-Cal, as the state has already done for young people up to age 19. It's...
Med tech growing part of Dayton start-up scene

Med tech growing part of Dayton start-up scene

A Dayton start-up that’s developing a new kind of surgical rod wants to enter the $1 billion market of childhood scoliosis, limb development and traumatic injury cases. AMB Surgical is now raising capital and aiming to get FDA clearance for its device, called the “flyte automated growing rod.” It’s among more than a dozen young companies in the Dayton region trying to develop...
Italy OKs living wills amid long-running euthanasia debate

Italy OKs living wills amid long-running euthanasia debate

Italy's Senate gave final approval Thursday to a law allowing Italians to write living wills and refuse artificial nutrition and hydration, the latest step in the Roman Catholic nation's long-running and agonizing debate over euthanasia and end-of-life issues. As soon as the 180-71 vote was tabulated, cheers erupted outside parliament among a small group of right-to-die activists who saw the bill...
WATCH: Joe Biden puts politics aside on 'The View' in emotional moment with Meghan McCain

WATCH: Joe Biden puts politics aside on 'The View' in emotional moment with Meghan McCain

Former Vice President Joe Biden set political differences aside on “The View” when he consoled Meghan McCain over the cancer diagnosis of her father, Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona, telling her that there’s “hope.” Sen. McCain was recently diagnosed with the glioblastoma, the same cancer that took the life of Biden’s son, Beau, in 2015. >>...
Being stubborn may help you live longer, new study suggests

Being stubborn may help you live longer, new study suggests

Stubbornness may actually be a trait that helps people live longer, a new study suggests. Published this week in the academic journal "International Psychogeriatrics", the study examined the mental and physical health of elderly Italians living in a remote village nestled between the Mediterranean Sea and mountains. The researchers behind the study, who hail from the University of Rome...
5 ways to stick with your New Year's fitness resolutions

5 ways to stick with your New Year's fitness resolutions

Many people make fitness-related New Year's resolutions, only to see them fall by the wayside. It's why gyms are packed in January, but back to normal by April. How can you keep the momentum going throughout the year to achieve your goal of better health and/or weight loss? It's easy to start off the New Year full of energy and grand plans, but starting small will give you a greater chance of...

UK surgeon admits signing initials on patients' livers

A British surgeon has admitted assaulting two patients by burning his initials into their livers during transplant operations. Simon Bramhall pleaded guilty Wednesday to two counts of assault, in a case a prosecutor called "without legal precedent in criminal law." Bramhall used an argon beam coagulator, which seals bleeding blood vessels with an electric beam, to mark his initials on the...
Baby's heart placed back inside her chest in rare surgeries

Baby's heart placed back inside her chest in rare surgeries

British officials say a baby born with an extremely rare condition has survived three surgeries to place her heart inside her chest. Glenfield Hospital in Leicester said Wednesday that baby Vanellope Hope was born in late November with her heart growing on the outside of her body. The unusual condition is called ectopia cordis. Dr. Nick Moore said the baby is in the hospital's pediatric intensive...
Russian nuclear plant says it emits leaked nuclear isotope

Russian nuclear plant says it emits leaked nuclear isotope

A senior executive at the Russian nuclear processing plant suspected of being behind a spike of radioactivity over Europe this fall admitted Wednesday that the isotope recorded does emerge as part of the plant's production cycle but said its levels are negligible. Russian officials last month reported high levels of Ruthenium-106 in areas close to the Mayak nuclear plant in the Ural Mountains. The...
EU Parliament votes against banning key kebab additive

EU Parliament votes against banning key kebab additive

The European Parliament on Wednesday narrowly defeated plans to ban an additive that is considered key in industrial meats for the popular doner kebab. Needing an absolute majority of at least 376 votes for a ban on phosphates, the legislature fell 3 votes short. The vote was 373-272 with 30 abstentions. The decision had been hotly awaited by the doner kebab industry, which says it needs the phosphates...
Lawyers clash over impact of Trump's rules on birth control

Lawyers clash over impact of Trump's rules on birth control

Lawyers for California and the U.S. Department of Justice clashed in court Tuesday over whether new rules from President Donald Trump's administration would dramatically reduce women's access to free birth control. Deputy Assistant Attorney General Ethan Davis urged a federal judge not to grant the state's request to block the policy change to President Barack Obama's health care law, saying it was...

'Booze Traveler' host Jack Maxwell, 54, says he has cancer

Travel Channel host Jack Maxwell says he's undergoing treatment for cancer. The personality behind the popular "Booze Traveler" series tweeted Tuesday: "I have cancer. 3 little words, one big sentence." The 54-year-old Boston native says he's being treated in Arizona for non-Hodgkins lymphoma. He adds: "I'm good though. Keep you posted." "Booze Traveler" premiered...

12 governors urge Congress to fund children's health program

Twelve governors of both parties are urging Congress to reauthorize funding for a popular children's health insurance program as soon as possible. The recommendation involving the Children's Health Insurance Program, or CHIP, came in a letter to congressional leaders Tuesday. Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich (KAY'-sik) and Democratic Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper led the letter-writing effort. It...
Is the ‘man flu’ real? Scientists claim men experience worse flu symptoms

Is the ‘man flu’ real? Scientists claim men experience worse flu symptoms

Don’t accuse men of overreacting when they’re sick — the “man flu” is real, scientists claim. A scientist is arguing that men might experience worse cold and flu symptoms than women. Dr. Kyle Sue, a clinical assistant professor in family medicine form the Memorial University of Newfoundland, published an article in the British Medical Journal that argues there are many...
WATCH: Jimmy Kimmel holds infant son during tearful monologue about children's health care

WATCH: Jimmy Kimmel holds infant son during tearful monologue about children's health care

On Monday, late-night host Jimmy Kimmel delivered an emotional monologue while holding his 7-month-old son, Billy, after taking a week off as the baby boy recovered from heart surgery. A tearful Kimmel asked lawmakers to restore the Children's Health Insurance Program, which expired two months ago. "This is literally a life-and-death program for American kids," Kimmel said. "It&rsquo...
India says Chinese construction on river dirtying water

India says Chinese construction on river dirtying water

Officials in India's northeast are complaining that Chinese construction activity on the upper reaches of one of the largest rivers that flows into India are likely turning the waters downstream turbid and unfit for human consumption. Over the weekend, Sarbananda Sonowal, the chief minister of India's Assam state, said the Brahmaputra river was contaminated with bacteria and iron, with laboratory...
Late-night host Kimmel holds son, pleads for health care

Late-night host Kimmel holds son, pleads for health care

Jimmy Kimmel held his baby son as he returned to his late-night show after a week off for the boy's heart surgery. Kimmel was crying from the first moment of his monologue Monday night as he pleaded with Congress to restore and improve children's health coverage, a cause he has championed since his son Billy was born with a heart defect in April. Billy needed one surgery just after his birth and had...
New CDC Director questioned about financial conflicts

New CDC Director questioned about financial conflicts

A U.S. Senator is criticizing the director of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for an apparent financial conflict of interest that the senator says may prevent the director from doing her job. Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald became director of the Atlanta-based CDC in July, and was required to sell a range of stocks she owned, including beer and soda companies, the tobacco company Philip Morris International...
Ash falls like snow as celebrities flee California community

Ash falls like snow as celebrities flee California community

Ash fell like snow and heavy smoke had residents gasping for air Monday as a huge Southern California wildfire exploded in size again, becoming the fifth largest in state history and driving celebrities from a wealthy hillside enclave. Tens of thousands have fled their homes as flames churn through foothill towns near Santa Barbara, the latest flare-up after a week of wind-fanned wildfires throughout...

Countering a familial chain of obesity; 4 ways

The factors that cause obesity to run in families are so powerful that statistics show 80 percent of those born to obese parents will struggle with obesity themselves. “A person’s genetics and their family environment play a big role in whether they become obese,” said Chandan Gupta, MD, a family physician with Monroe Medical Center. “We know genetics plays a role, but research...

5 tips for happier holidays

This year, give yourself the best holiday gift ever: more merry, magical moments and fewer frazzled ones. Here are five ways to make this year’s celebrations high on joy and low on stress — and help you keep the happy in the holidays. 1. Ratchet down those expectations. Chasing after picture-perfect get-togethers can create the perfect storm of stress. It’s OK if your guests arrive...
Some glitches seen in deadline week for 'Obamacare' sign-ups

Some glitches seen in deadline week for 'Obamacare' sign-ups

Consumer advocates reported some glitches Monday in the final days for "Obamacare" sign-ups, although the Trump administration largely seemed to be keeping its promise of a smooth enrollment experience. In Illinois, some consumers who successfully completed an application for financial assistance through HealthCare.gov got a message saying they would likely be eligible to buy a health plan...
Baby formula maker calls global recall over salmonella fears

Baby formula maker calls global recall over salmonella fears

Baby milk maker Lactalis and French authorities have ordered a global recall of millions of products over fears of salmonella bacteria contamination. The French company, one of the world's largest dairy groups, said it was warned by health authorities in France that 26 infants have become sick since Dec. 1. According to a list published on the French health ministry's website, the recall affects customers...
Deaths from window blinds show need for cord ban, study says

Deaths from window blinds show need for cord ban, study says

Children's injuries and deaths from window blinds have not stalled despite decades of safety concerns, according to a new U.S. study that recommends a complete ban on blinds with cords. Nearly 17,000 young children were hurt by window blinds between 1990 and 2015, and though most injuries were minor, almost 300 died, the study shows. Most deaths occurred when children became entangled or strangled...

Officials: Patients at risk at Dallas psychiatric hospital

Federal officials have warned that patients at a psychiatric hospital in Dallas are in "immediate jeopardy" two years after Texas regulators threatened to close the facility over severe safety problems, a newspaper reported Sunday. A Nov. 1 letter from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services addressed to Timberlawn's chief executive said that Timberlawn Mental Health System "...

Flu cases increase, first case admitted at Dayton Children’s

The flu season appears to be coming early this year to the region, with children among those at high risk from the virus. The Ohio Department of Health said the state is above the five-year average for the number of cases reported this time of year and “significantly higher” than the same time last year. There have been 92 flu-associated hospitalizations reported in Ohio for the week ending...
Drug companies sue to block California drug price law

Drug companies sue to block California drug price law

Pharmaceutical companies on Friday sued to block a new California law that would require them to give advance notice before big price increases. The law was approved this year in response to consumer outrage over a rise in drug spending and high costs for some prescription treatments, including new Hepatitis C medications and EpiPens to control allergic reactions. The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers...
US flu season off to an early start; widespread in 7 states

US flu season off to an early start; widespread in 7 states

This year's flu season is off to a quick start and so far it seems to be dominated by a nasty bug. Health officials say the flu vaccine seems well matched to the viruses making people sick, but it's too early to tell how bad this season will be. The main flu bug this season tends to cause more deaths and hospitalizations and vaccines tend not to work as well against this type. Flu began picking up...
Blood test may help predict which breast cancers will recur

Blood test may help predict which breast cancers will recur

A blood test five years after breast cancer treatment helped identify some women who were more likely to relapse, long before a lump or other signs appeared, a preliminary study found. It was the largest experiment so far to use these tests, called liquid biopsies , for breast cancer. Results suggest they someday may help reveal which women need longer preventive therapy and which ones can be spared...
Russia claims radioactivity spike not due to nuclear plant

Russia claims radioactivity spike not due to nuclear plant

Russian authorities denied Friday that a radioactivity spike in the air over Europe this fall resulted from a nuclear fuel processing plant leak in the Ural mountains, saying their probe has found no release of radioactivity there. Vladimir Boltunov of Russia's Rosatom state nuclear corporation said an inspection of the Mayak nuclear plant has proven that it wasn't the source of Ruthenium-106, a radioactive...

Uganda controls deadly Marburg fever outbreak, WHO says

The World Health Organization says Uganda has successfully controlled a deadly outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever, an infectious disease related to Ebola. The U.N. agency said Friday that three people died during the outbreak in eastern Uganda near the Kenya border. It says Ugandan health workers followed up with 316 close contacts of the victims in Uganda and Kenya to ensure that they had not...
Philippines wants money back from Sanofi for dengue vaccine

Philippines wants money back from Sanofi for dengue vaccine

The Philippine government will demand a refund of 3.5 billion pesos ($69.5 million) from vaccine maker Sanofi Pasteur and look at possible legal action after a study showed the vaccine used in a dengue immunization program could expose some people to severe illness, the health chief said Friday. Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said the government will also seek compensation for treatment of children...
Prosecutors insist eye doc stole $136 million from Medicaid

Prosecutors insist eye doc stole $136 million from Medicaid

Either Dr. Salomon Melgen is one of the biggest Medicare swindlers ever, stealing more than $100 million from the federal health care program, or a penny ante thief who walked off with $64,000. Those were the widely contrasting arguments made Thursday by prosecutors and Melgen's defense attorneys as they tried to persuade U.S. District Judge Kenneth A. Marra to sentence the Dominican-born, Harvard-trained...
Eating healthy diet also good for environment, study finds

Eating healthy diet also good for environment, study finds

Eating healthy is not only beneficial to your body -- it benefits the environment, too, according to a recent report. Researchers from universities in the Netherlands recently conducted an experiment, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, to determine how dietary choices impact the environment. To do so, they used Exiobase, an input-output database that represents...
Are 3-D mammograms really better? US puts scans to the test

Are 3-D mammograms really better? US puts scans to the test

A better mammogram? Increasingly women are asked if they want a 3-D mammogram instead of the regular X-ray — and now U.S. health officials are starting a huge study to tell if the newer, sometimes pricier choice really improves screening for breast cancer. It's the latest dilemma in a field that already vexes women with conflicting guidelines on when to get checked: Starting at age 40, 45 or...
A Medicaid challenge: Poor health, but a drive to improve

A Medicaid challenge: Poor health, but a drive to improve

It's one of Medicaid's challenges. While low-income people are more likely to struggle with health problems such as smoking and depression, new research shows many are motivated to improve. Thursday's study from the Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index found that 40 percent of people on Medicaid say they're in fair or poor health, compared with 11 percent of those with workplace coverage. The analysis...

Ohio awards $10M to boost opioid, addiction breakthroughs

Ohio awarded $10 million in grants Thursday to six companies and a university that have come up with innovative scientific ideas to address the national opioid epidemic. The Ohio Third Frontier Commission awarded the grants for ideas that include development of pain management alternatives and a mobile app to improve addiction treatment. The seven grant winners emerged from a field of 44 initial projects...
Ohio State sells Naloxone kits at student pharmacy

Ohio State sells Naloxone kits at student pharmacy

The Ohio State University is selling Naloxone, an overdose-reversing drug, at its student pharmacy. Kits containing the generic form of Narcan are available over the counter at the Wilce Student Health Center, the university announced on its website. The push for the university to offer the life-saving overdose drug comes after some students said there is a need for it amid the opioid crises, our...

Gas station hopes blue lights in bathroom can deter drug use

A Pennsylvania gas station is testing whether blue lights in bathrooms can discourage drug use by making it difficult for people to see their veins. The Sheetz gas station chain has installed the lights at its New Kensington location as a pilot project. Sheetz says it's working with local police on the initiative. Spokesman Nick Ruffner says the lighting is designed to help customers and employees...
Shulkin urges emergency aid for VA private health care soon

Shulkin urges emergency aid for VA private health care soon

In a fresh warning, Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin said Wednesday there could potentially be delays in providing medical care to tens of thousands of veterans if lawmakers don't act soon to approve billions in emergency funding for the ailing private-sector Choice program. In a statement, Shulkin said he was heartened by several congressional bills that would provide longer-term fixes to...

Gov't report: US health care tab hit $3.3T in 2016

The government says U.S. health care spending reached $3.3 trillion last year, which averages out to $10,348 for every man, woman, and child. The 4.3 percent annual increase actually represented slower growth than in 2015, but health care spending still grew faster than the economy. Health care accounted for 17.9 percent of the economy in 2016. Wednesday's update comes from the Office of the Actuary...
Gene therapy shows promise against blood-clotting disease

Gene therapy shows promise against blood-clotting disease

Gene therapy has freed 10 men from nearly all symptoms of hemophilia for a year so far, in a study that fuels hopes that a one-time treatment can give long-lasting help and perhaps even cure the blood disease. Hemophilia almost always strikes males and is caused by lack of a gene that makes a protein needed for blood to clot. Small cuts or bruises can be life-threatening, and many people need treatments...
Small risk of breast cancer seen with hormone contraceptives

Small risk of breast cancer seen with hormone contraceptives

Modern birth control pills that are lower in estrogen have fewer side effects than past oral contraceptives. But a large Danish study suggests that, like older pills, they still modestly raise the risk of breast cancer, especially with long-term use. Researchers found a similar breast cancer risk with the progestin-only intrauterine device, and they couldn't rule out a risk for other hormonal contraceptives...

Professor: Bad math led to $100 million Medicare fraud tally

Attorneys for a prominent Florida eye doctor used a statistician to challenge the government's assertion that he stole $100 million from the federal Medicaid program. The amount Dr. Salomon Melgen stole will help determine the length of his sentence. The government said its estimate is based on a random sample of 310 patients. But University of North Florida math professor Donna Mohr testified Wednesday...

Florida officer who saved Pulse shooting victim losing job

One of the first police officers to respond to the Pulse nightclub massacre is losing his job with only months to go before he's entitled to full pension benefits. He called on Florida lawmakers to do more to support first responders who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. The Eatonville Town Council agreed unanimously Tuesday night to pay Cpl. Omar Delgado some $1,200 in accrued sick time...
Health law sign-ups seen as falling short though more enroll

Health law sign-ups seen as falling short though more enroll

Americans are signing up in growing numbers for the Affordable Care Act's subsidized health insurance, the government said Wednesday. But with enrollment season cut in half and just over a week to go, experts say the final tally will likely fall short. About 3.6 million people signed up through Dec. 2 in states served by the federal HealthCare.gov website, according to the Centers for Medicare and...
Hundreds of thousands of poor people detained in hospitals

Hundreds of thousands of poor people detained in hospitals

Faida Mwenge's baby boy is nearly 3 months old but she and her son are still not allowed to leave the hospital — not until their bill is paid. The 20-year-old in eastern Congo has been detained since giving birth via an emergency cesarean section and owes hospital authorities $190 before she and little Jospin will be released. Mwenge is one of hundreds of thousands of people estimated to be...
Famed 'Concussion' pathologist alleges autopsy interference

Famed 'Concussion' pathologist alleges autopsy interference

San Joaquin County's chief medical examiner, known nationally as the doctor depicted in the movie "Concussion" about brain injuries among football players, resigned Tuesday over what he said was interference by the sheriff that has become so invasive that it borders on the unlicensed practice of medicine. Dr. Bennet Omalu accused Sheriff-Coroner Steve Moore of routinely interfering with...
Springfield nurse practitioner’s license suspended amid state probe

Springfield nurse practitioner’s license suspended amid state probe

A nurse practitioner accused of running a pain management clinic without a license is no longer allowed to work as a nurse. The Ohio Nursing Board has suspended Douglas L. Shrewsbury’s licenses to work as a registered nurse, a certified nurse practitioner and his certificate to prescribe, according to the nursing board’s website. Shrewsbury was under investigation for allegedly operating...
Yes, you can actually enjoy the holidays without gaining lbs. Here’s how

Yes, you can actually enjoy the holidays without gaining lbs. Here’s how

During the Christmas season, it's way too easy to eat, drink and merry your way to holiday weight gain while visiting with loved ones. A little puff pastry here, some spinach dip there - before you know it, you've overindulged. But it doesn't have to be that way. When it comes to maintaining your weight during the holidays, it's all about balance. Here are a few top tips to help you keep seasonal...
Can a broken heart kill you?

Can a broken heart kill you?

Just one day after actress Carrie Fisher died of a heart attack at age 60, her mother, Debbie Reynolds, 84, died of causes that were somewhat unclear, but involved complaints of shortness of breath. Friends and fans mourned them both on social media, with many sharing actor George Takei's view, shared in a tweet, that "Debbie died of a broken heart. She's with her daughter now...
5 everyday items you're using that are germier than you think

5 everyday items you're using that are germier than you think

As cold and flu season approaches, we all get a little bit more conscious about germs. Maybe you wash your hands more often or avoid that colleague sneezing in the corner cubicle. Despite your best efforts, however, you're almost certainly going to come into contact with bacteria on a daily basis. Even some of the most mundane items you touch regularly are infested with bacteria and germs. Sure, you...
World AIDS Day 2017: 9 facts about HIV/AIDS everyone should know

World AIDS Day 2017: 9 facts about HIV/AIDS everyone should know

World AIDS Day has been designated every December 1 since 1988 as a way to draw awareness of the disease and mourn the 35 million people who have died from it. The event has since shifted to focus on successes in the global fight against the disease and the importance of continuing these efforts for the 36.7 million worldwide who are living with HIV/AIDS. Yet, as recently as 2012, more than a...
Is feeding a cold a real thing? 5 winter health myths debunked

Is feeding a cold a real thing? 5 winter health myths debunked

You've probably heard winter health myths for years and you may have even accepted some of them as fact. From being told to bundle up, so you don't catch a cold to your neighbor swearing he got the flu from his flu shot, these myths make the rounds every winter. Mom always warned you you'd get sick if you didn't bundle up before heading out in cold weather. Her advice wasn't exactly horrible, since...
Is the weather giving you headaches? How to beat those weather pains

Is the weather giving you headaches? How to beat those weather pains

If your migraines seem more reliable than the weatherman in predicting storms and more accurate than a thermometer in gauging extreme heat or cold, it's not just in your head, according to Mayo Clinic expert Dr. Jerry W. Swanson. Certain weather changes really do cause migraine headaches. "Weather changes may cause imbalances in brain chemicals, including serotonin, which can prompt...
They did it!: 3 people who lost more than 100 pounds

They did it!: 3 people who lost more than 100 pounds

Anyone who's able to lose more than 100 pounds and keep it off possesses the trait of sheer determination, but each story from this weight-loss elite is a unique victory with its own tips and tactics. These three people shared lessons learned from weeks, months and years of losing weight. While you're admiring their success, you might just find a path that will work for you: At his heaviest, Jordan...
5 ways to to talk to your young child about the opioid epidemic

5 ways to to talk to your young child about the opioid epidemic

The trend is frightening and cannot be denied. To quote the Department of Health and Human Services: "Our nation is in the midst of an unprecedented opioid epidemic."  In 2015, more than 33,000 Americans died from an opioid overdose and drug overdose deaths nearly tripled during 1999–2014, with 61 percent of those resulting from opioids. The opioid crisis is heightened...
Silent Killer: 5 reasons to take a second look at your blood pressure

Silent Killer: 5 reasons to take a second look at your blood pressure

If your blood pressure jumped upon hearing that heart experts tightened the threshold for high blood pressure, you're not alone. For years, the condition was defined as having blood pressure of 140 over 90. The new threshold for "elevated blood pressure" is 120 over 80 – long the ideal for healthy adults – and high blood pressure is a reading above 130 over 80. According...

FITNESS CHECK: A few things to know before you step on the scale

Q: I’m trying to lose weight, and bought a scale to keep track of my progress. How often should I weigh myself? A: There are pros and cons to using a scale to gauge weight loss success. For some, checking weight on a daily basis helps keep them mindful and motivated to stay on track. For others, seeing the number on the scale is a stressful event, especially when pounds are not lost. I would...
Garth Brooks’ donation helps K99.1FM raise $310,000 for hospital

Garth Brooks’ donation helps K99.1FM raise $310,000 for hospital

Garth Brooks and his fellow county music entertainer wife Trisha Yearwood helped K99.1FM’s “Cares for Kids” Radiothon gather a record $310,713 in its 20th year raising money for Dayton’s Children’s Hospital. Brooks’ and Yearwood’s matching of funds meant each dollar in that hour was quadrupled leading to a total donation of nearly $50,000. It’s the second...
This exercise to help build lower-body strength for all skill levels

This exercise to help build lower-body strength for all skill levels

The Wall Squat is a compound movement, meaning that it is a multi-joint exercise targeting many muscle groups at the same time. Rep for rep, this exercise is very efficient in terms of lower body strengthening. Wall Squats are a good choice for beginners as well as for individuals who may not be able to perform a traditional non-supported squat due to injuries. Muscles worked: Quadriceps, hamstrings...
Social Security increase 2 percent next year for recipients.

Social Security increase 2 percent next year for recipients.

Millions of Social Security recipients and other retirees will get a 2 percent increase in benefits next year. It’s the largest increase since 2012 but comes to only $25 a month for the average beneficiary. The Social Security Administration announced the cost-of-living increase recently. The COLA affects benefits for more than 70 million U.S. residents, including Social Security recipients...
ACA rates going up in 2018

ACA rates going up in 2018

People who buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act will pay 34 percent more on average in Ohio next year. There will be about half as many insurers selling plans in Ohio and higher costs for buying insurance in 2018 amid uncertainty over whether President Donald Trump’s administration will follow through on threats to end subsidies that lower the cost of plans sold on the exchanges...
Hospice care available through Medicare

Hospice care available through Medicare

A few weeks ago, Kathy Brandt’s 86-year-old mother was hospitalized in Florida after a fall. After rushing to her side, Brandt asked for a consult with a palliative care nurse. “I wanted someone to make sure my mother was on the right medications,” Brandt said. For all her expertise — Brandt advises end-of-life organizations across the country — she was taken aback when...
12 expert-approved tips to avoid holiday weight gain

12 expert-approved tips to avoid holiday weight gain

During the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year’s, nibbling on chocolates, sugar cookies, pumpkin pie seems to be a way of life. The good news is it may not be as bad as you think. The average American gains about 1 pound during the winter holiday season, far less than the 5 to 8 pounds commonly believed, according to the National Institutes of Health. But the bad news is that people...
Type of knee replacement surgery determines recovery, resume activity

Type of knee replacement surgery determines recovery, resume activity

The knee is a powerful joint that allows someone to effortlessly perform everyday tasks such as walking their dog or climbing stairs. It’s something that isn’t given much thought until everyday pleasures come to a screeching halt when a knee refuses to do its job because of severe pain or the inability to move the right way. In most cases, the problem is brought on by osteoarthritis, a...
4 health questions every man in his 30s should ask his doctor

4 health questions every man in his 30s should ask his doctor

A man in his 30s might begin to lose some of the energy that propelled them through his 20s, but have no fear, there are plenty of ways to stay spry and in tip-top health long after your college years. Some open, honest conversations with your doctor about some of the top health concerns and issues men face in the 30s will increase your chances of sound, long-lasting health. The following questions...
Embracing Life On Cancer’s Journey

Embracing Life On Cancer’s Journey

Brenda Frey said her breast cancer journey has been energized by the power of prayer and a positive outlook. It’s also been enhanced by those with whom she has interacted at Upper Valley Medical Center’s Cancer Care Center, where she received chemotherapy and radiation in 2014. While discussing her diagnosis and treatment, the resident of the Houston area in Shelby County sported a T-shirt...

Seasonal time change: Does it only affect sleep habits?

The days are getting shorter and the temperature is dropping — reminders of the upcoming seasonal time change. Any change to the environment can influence changes in our eating patterns and food choices. Shorter days can contribute to spending more time inside and less time outside. This change in habit may contribute to being more active during daytime hours and less time active earlier in...
15 things everyone battling cancer must do

15 things everyone battling cancer must do

To those embarking on the cancer journey, know there is hope. You will find strength you never knew you had. You will grow in patience, love, faith and gratitude. You’ll learn what’s truly important and how to more deeply savor every moment. You will inspire others to do the same.  Here are 15 things I’ve learned in my journey that I share with you — 15 things everyone...
10 things that truly helped me during my cancer journey

10 things that truly helped me during my cancer journey

When folks learned I’d been diagnosed with breast cancer, their first response was almost always to offer help. Not everyone diagnosed knows what she might need or wants help from others — but I did. One of my BFFs joked I was going to become too lazy to ever do anything for myself again. I fear that may have actually happened. Here are some things that helped me and ideas for how you...
Why are more black women dying of breast cancer compared to white women?

Why are more black women dying of breast cancer compared to white women?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, black women under 60 years old are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women in the same age group. In fact, data from 2015 showed black women had a 39 percent higher breast cancer death rate. New research from Emory University, the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute points...
Why are more black women dying of breast cancer compared to white women?

Why are more black women dying of breast cancer compared to white women?

According to Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, black women under 60 years old are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women in the same age group. In fact, data from 2015 showed black women had a 39 percent higher breast cancer death rate. New research from Emory University, the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute...
Avoid the pain, get the gains: 5 most common exercise-related injuries

Avoid the pain, get the gains: 5 most common exercise-related injuries

For those that take their workouts seriously, be sure to add one more fitness goal to the list: avoiding exercise injuries.  Not only does getting hurt in the gym or on the trail cut back on how much time you spend getting fit,  it's also painful and treatment can be costly. Personal trainer Justin Price, M.A. told Men's Fitness that there are two main reasons for workout-related...
When it comes to eating well, what should you splurge (and save) on?

When it comes to eating well, what should you splurge (and save) on?

When I was 3 years old I never went anywhere without a purse. Sometimes it was stuffed with toys, sometimes it was empty, but it was always in my hand. My dad called me the bag lady. One thing was certain: I was a girly-girl through and through. Now I’m in my 30s and nothing has changed -- makeup, clothes, purses are my thing. If you want to know why I’m late to your party, it’s...
5 reasons to breastfeed your child 

5 reasons to breastfeed your child 

Many new moms have heard that "breast is best" when it comes to feeding their babies, but they may not have all the facts on just what makes it best. When you're making the personal decision about how to feed your child, it helps to know exactly why experts so strongly recommend breastfeeding. Breast milk contains antibodies, immune factors, enzymes and white blood cells – all of which...
5 ways to stop killing your back with bad posture at work

5 ways to stop killing your back with bad posture at work

"Sit up straight!" may sound like nagging straight out of the 1950s, but it's spot on advice for the 21st century workplace.  Constant shifting around to get comfortable at your work computer, and hunched over a smart phone at home, wreaks havoc on your back, neck and shoulders. Regular computer users perform 50,000 to 200,000 keystrokes each day, according to the nonprofit website...
It’s never to late to go get a mammogram

It’s never to late to go get a mammogram

Chaya Vidal of Englewood had her first mammogram two years ago, at 72. So she may seem an unlikely public champion of the test. But she’d learned a valuable lesson and felt compelled to share it in her synagogue’s bulletin. “There’s never been a history of cancer in my family, and I thought I was probably too old,” she said. Yet, there she was with an unexplained bruise...
The 3 things everyone must do when faced with cancer

The 3 things everyone must do when faced with cancer

Listen. Advocate. Support. These are the three most important things everyone faced with cancer — whether you are a patient, a spouse, a loved one or a friend — should keep in mind, said Tracy Adrian, Radiation Oncology Nurse and Breast Health Navigator for Springfield Regional Cancer Center. The first thing to do when faced with a diagnosis is listen. “You definitely want extra...
How Beavercreek woman faced two life-changing battles

How Beavercreek woman faced two life-changing battles

Faced with a breast cancer diagnosis, you could cry and get mad. If you’re like Heather Minton of Beavercreek, you do the opposite. “It’s a lot easier to be happy and know that whatever hurdles come at us, we are going to fight,” said the 43-year-old breast cancer survivor and dental hygienist. That positive, forward-looking attitude carried Minton and her family — husband...
Some foods help fight breast cancer

Some foods help fight breast cancer

People concerned about their cancer risk may find that switching their diets can do a world of good. Certain foods may reduce cancer risk, according to various cancer experts, including the MD Anderson Cancer Center. In addition, some foods might increase a person’s risk of developing cancer. Knowing what to put on the table come breakfast, lunch and dinner can go a long way toward reducing...
Understanding family cancer syndromes important

Understanding family cancer syndromes important

Few, if any, families have not been affected by cancer. While no individual or family is immune to cancer, some families may be more at risk of developing certain types of cancer than others. In many instances, cancers that run in families can be linked to behaviors that families share. For example, families that smoke tobacco may be more vulnerable to cancer than those that don’t, as the smoke...
1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer

1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer

Cancer is a word no one wants to hear. Unfortunately, according to BreastCancer.org, around one in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, while the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation notes that one in nine Canadian women will receive the same news. A cancer diagnosis is more manageable when patients have knowledgeable and supportive medical teams on their side...
Bra fitting important after mastectomy or reconstruction

Bra fitting important after mastectomy or reconstruction

Bra manufacturers insist that millions of women wear the wrong size bras. According to an international survey of 10,000 women from Swiss lingerie company Triumph, 64 percent of women are wearing the wrong size bra. Other studies suggest that figure is closer to 80 percent. While it can be challenging for women with healthy breasts to get the right fit, a well-fitting bra is essential, especially...
For breast cancer, your best defense is finding it early

For breast cancer, your best defense is finding it early

It happens to one in eight American women. Getting breast cancer isn’t something we can control. We do have the power, however, to take steps to find breast cancer early through screenings, self-exam and physical exam. “Early detection of breast cancer is absolutely key,” says Thomas Heck, MD, Surgical Director, Samaritan Breast Center at Good Samaritan North Health Center in Englewood...
Exercise helps women stay healthy during cancer treatment

Exercise helps women stay healthy during cancer treatment

Cancer can have many side effects that can leave you feeling weak, tired or ill. If you experience such side effects, your care team can help manage these side effects. Good nutrition, regular exercise and other wellness practices can go a long way to helping you stay healthy and energized during treatment. American Cancer Society (ACS) nutrition and exercise guidelines are a great place to start...
Local agencies get funds for mental health, substance abuse services

Local agencies get funds for mental health, substance abuse services

Local health community health centers are among the recipients of $7.4 million in Ohio grants. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the grants today, which are for mental health and addiction treatment services. “No corner of our country, from rural areas to urban centers, has escaped the scourge of the opioid crisis,” Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price...
Don’t fear this strengthening exercise; here’s how to do it right

Don’t fear this strengthening exercise; here’s how to do it right

The deadlift is often criticized for being a dangerous exercise. This stems from the fact that if performed incorrectly, it can increase risk of injury to the spine. However, when executed with proper form, it is an excellent exercise for strengthening the hamstrings, glutes and lower back. Muscles targeted: The gluteus maximus and the upper hamstrings are used in hip joint extension, while the erector...
FITNESS: 4 simple ways to stay fit during busy summer months

FITNESS: 4 simple ways to stay fit during busy summer months

During summer months it can be more difficult to keep a consistent schedule at the gym. With kids out of school, vacations, and heat and humidity zapping your energy, its nice to have an alternative workout plan. Options for home workouts require little to no maintenance, take up very little space and are far less expensive than a gym membership. These include: Dumbbells A staple of many home gyms...
3 healthy, tasty, barbecue-friendly recipes to try

3 healthy, tasty, barbecue-friendly recipes to try

With Memorial Day behind us and the Fourth of July on the horizon, it’s fair to say that it is officially the season for cook outs and backyard barbecues. But between the sugary BBQ sauce and the big pan of mac and cheese, it seems almost impossible to eat healthy.   If you’ve been working hard for your summer bod, you don’t have to throw it all out the window just...

4 ways to stop the cycle of eating in front of screens

How often do you sit in front of the TV or work on the computer with a bag of potato chips and just munch away? Or set up the tray table with your dinner and stare at the screen as the fork enters your mouth. Hence, why frozen dinners were called TV dinners back in the day. A new study by Tumin and Anderson recently showed that eating meals in front of the TV is associated with obesity risk. Other...
Exercise of the Month: Pullover Machine

Exercise of the Month: Pullover Machine

The Pullover machine can be found in most health clubs. It is an excellent exercise that uses back, chest and shoulder muscles. In addition to strengthening, it aids in breathing and expansion of the ribcage. In sports, the Pullover exercise is useful for conditioning muscles involved in overhead forward throwing motions involving both arms, such as in basketball, as well as complimenting moves used...

Ex-Special Forces officer, author to speak at 21st Air Force Marathon

: A former Special Forces officer and author will be the guest speaker for the 21st Air Force Marathon in September at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.  Ivan Castro was selected to address the audience at the various ceremonies. He is a highly decorated former officer who lost his eyesight while in combat in Iraq in 2006. Castro had to go through a 17-month rehabilitation of which he returned...

Registration opened for event to raise money for area cancer patients

What began in 2003 with just a dozen riders is now an annual event that has seen hundreds of cyclists and now runners and walkers raise funds to support programs benefiting Miami Valley cancer patients. Registration is now open for the Clemens Cancer Challenge, a bike ride and a 5k run/walk benefit for cancer patients at Miami Valley Hospital. The purpose of the event is to celebrate the memory of...

The best ways to avoid painful muscle cramps

A muscle cramps is a painful, sudden, uncontrolled contraction of a muscle, and can happen to anyone without warning. They occur most commonly in muscles that cross two joints, such as the calves, hamstrings and quadriceps. The exact cause of muscle cramps is not well understood, and there can be more than one contributing factor, including: Sudden changes in an exercise...

Living gluten-free has challenges, but you can manage them

The awareness to Celiac Disease has been increasing in the United States over the past 10 years. With this increased awareness comes an improved ability to diagnose this autoimmune disease that causes intestinal destruction with even the smallest consumption of foods that contain gluten. Following a gluten-free diet is an essential part of successfully healing the gut and successfully managing Celiac...
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