You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and interactive features. Starting at just 99c for 8 weeks.

X

Welcome to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Your source for Clark and Champaign counties’ hometown news. All readers have free access to a limited number of stories every month.

If you are a News-Sun subscriber, please take a moment to login for unlimited access.

NTSB: 787 battery approval should be reconsidered


By Joan Lowy

Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government should reassess its safety approval of the Boeing 787 lithium ion batteries, the nation’s top accident investigator said Thursday.

The National Transportation Safety Board’s investigation of last month’s battery fire in a Japan Airlines 787 “Dreamliner” while it was parked in Boston shows the fire started with multiple short-circuits in one of the battery’s eight cells, said the board’s chairman, Deborah Hersman. That created an uncontrolled chemical reaction known as “thermal runaway,” which is characterized by progressively hotter temperatures. That spread the short-circuiting to the rest of the cells and caused the fire, she said.

The findings are at odds with what Boeing told the Federal Aviation Administration when that agency was working to certify the company’s newest and most technologically advanced plane for flight, Hersman said. Boeing said its testing showed that any short-circuiting was contained within a single cell, preventing thermal runaway and fire, she told reporters at a news conference.

Boeing’s testing also showed the batteries were likely to cause smoke in only 1 in 10 million flight hours, she said. But the Boston fire was followed nine days later by a smoking battery in an All Nippon Airways plane that made an emergency landing in Japan. The 787 has recorded less than 100,000 flight hours, Hersman noted.

Investigators are still trying to determine why the first battery cell short-circuited, but the board’s findings appear to raise doubts about the thoroughness of FAA’s safety certification of the 787’s batteries and whether Boeing will be able to make a quick fix that returns the planes to the skies.

The same day as the ANA emergency landing, FAA officials ordered the only U.S. carrier with 787s — United Airlines, which has six of the planes — to ground them. Aviation authorities in other countries swiftly followed suit. In all, 50 planes operated by seven airlines in six countries are grounded.

The groundings have become a nightmare for the company, which has about 800 Dreamliner orders from airlines around the world.

GE Aviation, based in Evendale, supplies engines used in some 787s.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Business

Facebook glitch leads to old photos being posted without user permission
Facebook glitch leads to old photos being posted without user permission
Facebook's annual "Year In Review" feature recaps moments that users shared on the social media site during the past year, but PC Magazine reported Friday that a glitch that might be related to the feature is concerning to some.
EF Hutton hires new CFO as business looks to grow
EF Hutton hires new CFO as business looks to grow
Dayton, Cincinnati Kroger locations hiring for 600 people
Dayton, Cincinnati Kroger locations hiring for 600 people
$7.5M Love’s Travel Stop set to open in Clark County in January
$7.5M Love’s Travel Stop set to open in Clark County in January
Funding denied for Dayton’s Entrepreneurs Center
Funding denied for Dayton’s Entrepreneurs Center
More Stories