8 easy, money-making side gigs for teens 


Whether it's the teen who'd like extra money for things like clothes or gas or a parent who'd like to see their high school or college-aged child get off the couch when school’s out, a part-time job can be a wonderful thing.

»RELATED: Apple hiring for work from home positions

Of course, child labor laws dictate how young is too young to work and what hours (and under what conditions) older teens can work. They'll eliminate a few job options for teens, but there are still plenty of places to work. 

Just keep in mind a few things, according to the team at Localwise: "It's important to be able to get to your job easily and relatively stress-free." They also advised teens to make sure the job fits with their schedule and note any unique experience a job might require before applying.

»Localwise and other employment bloggers recommended these eight part-time jobs for full-time teens:

Barista: "Working as a barista will hone your skills at making the perfect cup," Localwise noted. If you can hack the early morning shifts, it also gives you a chance to become a coffee snob.

Juice/smoothie shop cashier: "The only thing you need to know going into this job is how not to stick your hand into a blender," Localwise joked. There is also a little math involved, so overall this job is great for teens looking for money-handling experience or who are interested in non-greasey fast food work.

Lifeguard: Localwise considers this job as "close to Super Hero as it gets." While lifeguard jobs can involve winter hours at health clubs and indoor pools, they're more likely to be available in the warm months. Check into water parks too. Be sure to find out where you'll get your CPR training and lifeguard certification - and who pays for it.

Caddy: One of Localwise's "best paying jobs for teens," caddies can make $50 to $100 in a day, sometimes in cash, and you can choose your own hours. You do need to know your way around a golf course and be able to walk and lift equipment, though. 

Product merchandiser: Teens can flourish on the sales floor of a shop, restocking, taking inventory and styling display mannequins. Expect to make around $12.50 per hour in this position, according to Localwise.

Car wash attendant: Money Crashers highly recommended working at a car wash for students who like to stay busy at work, like to have a shiny car themselves (since they can probably get washing services free) and would appreciate the occasional tip in adddition to minimum wage.

Packing and moving services: If you like to stay active and are organized, look into working for a bonded and insured moving company as an assistant for packing and moving personal possessions.

Photo scanner and archivist: Teens whose schedules are chock-full of activities and high-pressure homework can still take on work if they concentrate on side hustles instead of employer-based schedules, according to Money Crashers. One good idea scanning and archiving documents and photos. "No one has the time to tackle this time-consuming task," Money Crashers noted. 

How to help your teen get a job

It's a good idea for parents to stay involved in the job-seeking process, according to Readers Digest Canada. They recommended these steps:

  • Keep the resume current. Get a jump on other summer job seekers by polishing resumes as soon as kids decide they want employment. Check with your child's high school, community job centers and job-seeking websites for help. Review the job history section yourself, reminding your child of any assets, awards or experience she may have neglected to include. "We look for sports, drama, yearbook - anything that shows the applicant doesn't just watch TV," Jim Shaw, franchise owner of 11 Tim Horton's restaurants in Nova Scotia, told the magazine.
  • Brainstorm references. Be ready to provide reference letters from teachers, coaches, baby-sitting clients, your minister or a family friend.
  • Practice the interview. Pretend you're the employer asking questions. For a real confidence boost, have your teen write down and rehearse answers. Keep in mind that employers are mostly looking for enthusiasm from teen employees. 
  • Pound the pavement. Teenagers need to be on the lookout for "Help Wanted" signs, but they can also approach businesses that appeal to them but aren't hiring at the moment. The student who checks in every now and then is the one who will come to mind when that business finally has an opening.


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