Despite surge, many don’t see a stock bubble


By Ken Sweet

AP Markets Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Is the stock market due for a pullback?

The Dow Jones industrial average has surged 900 points since early October and crossed the 16,000-point threshold Monday. IPOs are hot again. Small investors, stirred from their post-recession daze, are coming back to stocks. And it’s been more than two years since the market has had a significant slump.

Those trends have raised concerns of a stock bubble. They shouldn’t, money managers say, because even with the broader market’s 26 percent jump this year, stocks aren’t overpriced yet.

“Stocks are not cheap, but that does not mean that the stock market is expensive,” says Russ Koesterich, chief investment strategist with Blackrock.

The ratio of stock prices to projected profits for companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index is 15, according to data from FactSet. That’s slightly below the average of 16.2 over the last 15 years and far below the peak of 25 in late 1990s and early 2000s.

Underneath the rally, most of the fundamentals of this market remain solid. Corporate profit margins are near historic highs and profits are expected to keep rising. There are no signs the U.S. economy, which is still recovering from the 2008 financial crisis and Great Recession, will slip back into a downturn.

All that leaves investors with conflicting feelings. Few see the stock market as attractive as it was at the beginning of the year, but fewer see an alternative where they should put their money.

Bonds are down 2.1 percent this year, according to the benchmark Barclays U.S. Aggregate bond index. Cash has a near-zero return in money market funds. Gold has dropped 24 percent.

“It’s hard to say stocks are expensive when you compare them to any other asset class,” says Brian Hogan, director of equities at Fidelity Investments. “The other options are simply not attractive.”

Bubble or no, there are some signs that stocks are getting pricey.

Individual investors have been returning to the market, often a sign that stocks are reaching their peak. Individual investors poured $167 billion into stock mutual funds this year, according to data from Lipper. In comparison, large institutional investors like hedge funds, pension funds, endowments and insurance companies have only put in $111 billion.



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